Gingerbread Dutch Baby

gingerbread dutch baby

Okay, I have a question for all the Dutch babies out there: where, I repeat, WHERE, have you been all my life??? These are the coolest, easiest, tastiest things EVER! You simply whip up a simple pancake-like batter – in the blender, no less! – and then you melt some butter in a cast-iron skillet. Once it’s melted, brush it up the sides, pour in the batter, and poof! You’re done with your part and the oven does the rest of the work.

Gingerbread Dutch Baby

Inside the oven, these babies puff, and wrinkle, and cave, and look so cool when you pull them out. The edges crisp but the inside stays moist. Texturally they are somewhere between a French crepe and an American pancake. Dutch babies are also known as German pancakes, and you’ve gotta wonder if this is just German efficiency at work here. Because they get whipped up in no time, way less time than it takes to make a batch of crepes or pancakes, and they taste just as good if not better than either! Oh, and perfect to serve to a brunch crowd.

Gingerbread Dutch baby

I wanted to make something gingerbread for the holiday season (it seems that December is the only acceptable month to make anything gingerbread-themed in Food Blog Land), and couldn’t decide between waffles, or cookies, or maybe a cake; and then I remembered this recipe for a gingerbread Dutch baby, and now here I am! This would make a perfect Christmas Day brunch if you’re so inclined. Enjoy!

Gingerbread Dutch baby, sliced

{One year ago: Pumpkin French Toast}

Source: The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook

Ingredients:
2 large eggs
1 tbs brown sugar
1 tsp unsulfured molasses
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
¼ tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp ground ginger
Pinch of ground cloves
1/8 tsp freshly grated or ground nutmeg
1/8 tsp salt
1/3 cup whole milk
2 tbs unsalted butter
Maple syrup, to serve

Directions:
Preheat your oven to 400 F. Crack the eggs into a blender and puree until they are smooth and pale yellow in color. Shut off the blender, then add the brown sugar, molasses, flour, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, nutmeg, salt, and whole milk. Process until smooth, stopping to scrape down the sides as needed. Set aside.
Melt the butter over high heat in a 9 or 10 inch cast-iron, or other oven-proof skillet. The original recipe calls for a 9 inch, the closest I had was a 10 inch cast iron, and it worked just fine. As the butter is melting, brush it up on the sides of the skillet thoroughly. Remove the pan from the heat, then pour the batter into the skillet. Immediately transfer the skillet to the oven and bake for 15 to 20 minutes. (Mine, in the larger 10 inch skillet, took only 15 minutes to bake).
Slide the Dutch baby onto a plate, or leave in the skillet; slice into wedges and serve with the maple syrup. You can also dust powdered sugar on the top; that’s how it is pictured in the SK cookbook, and it looks just scrumptious that way, but as someone who got a little hurried to snap pics because the scrambled eggs were getting cold, I can assure you that it’s just fine without.

One response to “Gingerbread Dutch Baby

  1. Pingback: Sage-Rosemary Popovers | The Texan New Yorker

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