Smoky Scrambled Duck Eggs with Tomatoes on Toast Points

Smoky Scrambled Duck Eggs with Tomatoes on Toast Points 5346

I am so predictable. Really, I am. Every time I get a new cookbook, I make a beeline for any recipe that can even remotely resemble a Tex-Mex dish, and that usually ends up what I make first. And I kid you not, this is every time. And I usually don’t even realize I’m doing it until the meal is on the table.

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I mean, seriously, take it from me to buy Plenty, a book by an Israeli-born Londoner, and find one of the *few* Tex-Mex-ish recipes in there to make first. You really wouldn’t even expect such a thing from Ottolenghi, but the man’s genius seems to know no bounds, and yes, he has a sort-of version of migas.

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Only he uses duck eggs. (Which you can find at Whole Foods, and no, they are not cheap). I’d never experimented with duck eggs before, and I must say, they are a bit different from chicken eggs. I get why people go gaga over them. They are larger, so you don’t need as many, and they are richer and more luxurious.

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This dish is great as is of course, but I firmly believe you could use chicken eggs with spectacular results. If you’re looking to get all fancy and impress someone, definitely splurge for the duck eggs, but it’s not wholly necessary. Enjoy!

Smoky Scrambled Duck Eggs with tomatoes on toast points 5337

{One Year Ago: Apple-Pork Ragout over Pappardelle}

Source: adapted from Plenty by Yotam Ottolenghi

Ingredients:
2 dried chipotle chiles, stems removed and seeds shaken out
2 thick slices sourdough bread, regular or whole wheat
Softened butter, for spreading
1 tbs olive oil
2 garlic cloves, sliced
2 scallions, chopped
2 plum tomatoes, seeded and roughly chopped
3 duck eggs, or 4 large chicken eggs
Kosher salt and black pepper, to taste
Handful of cilantro leaves, chopped
Sour cream, for serving

Directions:
Place the dried chipotles in a small stockpot over medium-high heat. Toast for about a minute, flipping once, until you can just smell them. Fill the pot with water and bring to a boil. Once it’s boiling, shut off the heat and cover the pot. Let it sit for 20 minutes. When the chiles have rehydrated and are soft and pliable, transfer them to a cutting board and dice.
Place a large cast-iron skillet over medium to medium-high heat. Dry toast the sourdough slices on both sides until golden brown and crisped. Remove them to a plate and immediately smear the butter onto one side. Set aside, tenting with foil to keep warm.
Wipe the bread crummies out of the skillet, then place it back on medium heat. Add the olive oil to the pan, then the garlic and scallions. When they begin to turn golden, increase the heat to medium-high and add the tomatoes and chipotle. Cook, stirring frequently, another 2 to 3 minutes.
Break the eggs into a bowl and beat gently with salt and black pepper to taste. Pour the eggs into the skillet and cook, stirring moderately, until they have reached your desired scrambled egg consistency. Runny eggs will only take 30 to 60 seconds, longer if you want them firmer.
As soon as the eggs are done, shut off the heat. Place the toasts on serving plates, spoon the eggs on top and sprinkle with cilantro. Serve immediately with the sour cream on the side or on top, if desired.

5 responses to “Smoky Scrambled Duck Eggs with Tomatoes on Toast Points

  1. I have never tried using duck eggs in making a scramble yet but your post is certainly making me want to soon! What a hearty and delicious breakfast for sure!

  2. I love new variations on breakfast! Thanks for explaining what duck eggs are like. I have been wanting to try them but have been reluctant. If a formerly picky eater likes them, I feel more comfortable trying them. So thank you!

  3. I love the smoky flavor going on in this dish. I’ve tried a few Ottolenghi recipes and have been impressed with them all…I need to try duck eggs!

  4. First of all, I love Yotam Ottolenghi. The recipes in his cookbooks are amazing. I could lick the pictures, but I’m sure it would taste better if I actually made more of the recipes! LOL Second, our local farmer’s market occasionally has duck eggs, and now I have an excuse to buy/try them. Thanks for the inspiration!

  5. I don’t blame you for going for the tex-mex dish if it comes out that pretty! That’s one of my favorite cookbooks too!

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