Tag Archives: Asian

Shishito Dogs

Shishito Dogs

Shishito peppers are somewhat annoying – there I said it. Their growing season is quite short – I mean, not sour cherry short, but much shorter than I’d prefer seeing as I’ve completely fallen in love with them. Also, they can be hard to find. I have relatively easy access to about seven or eight grocery stores plus a few farmer’s markets, and I can never count on them being there, even during their height of seasonality. Like I said – annoying!

Shishito Dogs

But, their irritating qualities are quite forgivable for being so unique and delicious. The heat level can vary with these guys. Some batches I’ve made have barely registered on the spice scale where others have blown our heads off.

Shishito Dogs

If you can get your hands on a batch, you should totally put them on hot dogs. It’s probably my favorite shishito preparation yet, and I don’t anticipate being able to top it anytime soon.

Shishito Dogs

Everything about this hot dog is perfect. Highly recommend! Enjoy!

Shishito Dogs

Source: Bon Appetit Magazine, July 2016

Ingredients:

SPICY MAYO:
½ cup mayonnaise
3 tbs sambal oelek
1 tbs unseasoned rice vinegar
Salt to taste

BLISTERED SHISHITO PEPPERS:
6 oz. shishito peppers
2 tbs olive oil
Salt and pepper, to taste
2 tbs unseasoned rice vinegar

8 hot dogs, warmed/charred
8 hot dog buns, toasted if desired
Toasted nori sheets
Sesame seeds, for sprinkling

Directions:
To make the SPICY MAYO: Mix the mayo, sambal, rice vinegar and salt until smooth. Set aside.
To make the BLISTERED SHISHITO PEPPERS: preheat a grill or indoor grill pan over medium-high heat. Toss the peppers with the olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill, turning occasionally, until tender and blistered all over, about 3 minutes. Toss in a bowl with the rice vinegar. Let cool, then remove the stems.
You can use the grill to char/warm your hot dogs and toast the buns for convenience.
To assemble: spread one or both sides of the bun with spicy mayo – your preference there. Add a hot dog to each bun, then line one side of the bun with toasted nori sheets. Top the dog with the peppers, then sprinkle sesame seeds on top. Serve immediately.

Vietnamese Spareribs with Chile and Lemongrass

Vietnamese Spareribs with Chile and Lemongrass

I think that in addition to having a lot going on this summer, one of my other lame excuses for not blogging much has been writer’s block. Like I said, lame. Every professional writer (of which I am certainly not) seems to give the same advice for curing writer’s block: just sit down and write. So, I shall finally take that long-overdue advice to make this post happen at long last!

Vietnamese Spareribs with Chile and Lemongrass

Vietnamese Spareribs with Chile and Lemongrass

The words aren’t coming to me in any entertaining or sophisticated fashion, but you really need these spareribs in your life. They’re so cute and little! Summers are for pool parties, and these would be perfect to set out at an adults-only one, particularly if said shindig involves copious amounts of bourbon and/or a quasi-legal inhalable substance. Strong Asian flavors and a touch of heat, and it’s really tough to stop eating them. Tender with just the right amount of chew. Utterly delicious. I’ll let the recipe speak for itself. Enjoy!

Vietnamese Spareribs with Chile and Lemongrass

Source: ever so slightly adapted from Pure Pork Awesomeness by Kevin Gillespie

Ingredients:
3 ½ lbs. Asian-style (flanken) pork spareribs*
2 tsp kosher salt
10 cloves garlic, peeled
1 stalk lemongrass, sliced
3 Thai bird chiles
¼ red onion, stem and roots trimmed, cut into chunks
2 tbs sugar
2-inch pieces of fresh ginger, peeled and rough-chopped
1 tbs fish sauce
1 tbs soy sauce
1 lime
¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro

*Basically flanken spareribs are cut horizontally into thirds; have your butcher do it

Directions:
Preheat your oven to 325 F. Place a broiler pan or cooling rack on a rimmed baking sheet (it must be rimmed). Grease the cooling rack with cooking spray. Season the ribs with 1 tsp salt and place on the cooling rack. Add a ¼-inch depth of boiling water to the baking pan, then wrap the ribs with aluminum foil. Place in the oven and cook until the ribs are pull-apart tender, 1 ½ to 2 hours. Basically, yes, you’re steaming the ribs.

In the bowl of a food processor, combine the garlic, lemongrass, chiles, onions, and ginger, and process 30 seconds, until well chopped. Add the sugar, fish sauce, soy sauce, and the remaining 1 tsp salt. Continue to process until a coarse paste is formed, scraping down the sides of the bowl a few times.

Adjust the rack in the oven to the highest setting and preheat the broiler to HIGH.
Remove the ribs temporarily and pour off the water in the baking sheet. If you don’t do this, the ribs won’t crisp up properly. Arrange the ribs, meat side up, on the rack and smear with some of the paste. Broil the ribs until nicely caramelized, 5 minutes. Flip them, smear the other side with some paste and broil on the bone side for 3 minutes. Flip them again, smear with the remaining paste, and broil a final time to get them nice and crispy on the meat side, about 2 more minutes.

Using tongs, transfer the ribs to a cutting board and cut into single-bone pieces. Squeeze the lime onto the ribs and sprinkle with cilantro. Serve immediately.

Thai-Indian Beef Lettuce Cups #SundaySupper

Thai-Indian Beef Lettuce Cups

Welcome to another Sunday Supper, where we are having Finger Foods for Dinner! I think we’d all agree that our inner children rejoice at any opportunity to not have to pick up a fork, right? I chose to make lettuce cups, one of my new favorite foods, and helpful that it’s lighter fare made delicious, too.

Thai-Indian Beef Lettuce Cups

Certainly not always, but lettuce cups are often of the Asian persuasion, and this one fuses the heat and ginger of Thailand with the curry of India for one delicious and SPICY hand-held meal. Spicy enough, in fact, that you should not congratulate yourself on eating low-carb until AFTER you’ve managed to get through this without guzzling a beer to cool off your burning lips and tongue. I deserve absolutely zero back pats on this front.

Thai-Indian Beef Lettuce Cups

But, it’s wickedly delicious, with incredible and complex flavor and the perfect texture. Oh, and you can totally back off on the heat level if you want. Combining lean beef (which I’d highly recommend for this purpose) and a drizzle of sesame oil at the end makes for the perfect pleasantly oily texture to complement the heft of the ground beef and soft lettuce leaves. This is one of my few repeat meals. Enjoy!

Thai-Indian Beef Lettuce Cups

And make sure you check out all the fun Finger Foods brought to you by my fellow Sunday Supper bloggers!

Source: Tangy, Tart, Hot and Sweet by Padma Lakshmi

Ingredients:
2 heads butter lettuce, or Boston lettuce
3 tbs canola oil
1 ½ lbs. lean ground beef
1 cup diced yellow onions
1 tsp minced garlic
1 tbs minced fresh ginger
4 serrano chiles, or 20 green Thai chiles, chopped (you can seed the serranos if desired)
1-2 tbs soy sauce
1 generous tsp curry powder
1 tsp amchoor (dried mango powder), optional
1 cup rough chopped fresh mint
1 cup rough chopped fresh basil
1 ½ tbs fresh lemon juice
Salt, to taste if needed
1 tbs toasted sesame oil

Directions:
Separate the lettuce leaves, discarding any that have browned or wilted. The inner leaves tend to be sturdier and better suited for lettuce cups. Dry the leaves well if needed and set aside.
Preheat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the oil, then the beef, crumbling and cooking until no traces of pink remain. Lower the heat to medium and add the onion, garlic, ginger, and chiles. Cook, stirring frequently, until the onions are soft, 5 to 7 minutes.
Now add the soy sauce, curry powder, and amchoor if using. Stir to combine then turn the heat to low and let it simmer very gently for a few minutes to let the flavors marry well.
Stir in the mint, basil and lemon juice. Taste for seasoning and add salt if needed.
To serve, spoon the mixture into the prepared lettuce cups and lightly drizzle sesame oil over each cup. Serve immediately.

Pinky Appetizers

Manual Mains

Digit Desserts

Plus Bite-sized Pavlovas and More Finger Food Recipes from Sunday Supper Movement

Sunday Supper MovementJoin the #SundaySupper conversation on twitter on Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. To get more great Sunday Supper Recipes, visit our website or check out our Pinterest board. Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement.

Asian-Style Duck Tacos with Plum Pico de Gallo

Asian Style Duck Tacos with Plum Pico de Gallo

I think most of us in the US would agree that peaches tend to be the heavyweight champions of stone fruit season. But if that’s indeed true, then I’d say that plums are the minor league champs, and deserve their day in the spotlight. And I for one get very excited when these underrated champs reach their peak high season! My local grocery store has them on full display, right there on the sidewalk, both black and red varieties looking proud, plump, and delicious.

black plums

I knew I wanted a savory application for the beauties, and thanks to me buying twice as many corn tortillas than I needed last weekend, tacos began to make a lot of sense. (Due to the excess of corn tortillas, we’ve actually been eating a LOT of tacos around here lately).

plum pico de gallo

I must admit, I’ve never before warmed to the idea of “fusion tacos” – but, well, when you’re eating as many tacos as we have been lately, the idea starts sounding better and better. So that’s where Asian style duck tacos come into play. These are reminiscent of a Peking duck. They marinate in a basic Chinese style combination of garlic, ginger, soy, and hoisin.

Asian Style Duck Tacos with Plum Pico de Gallo

The plums actually stand in for, rather than accompany, the traditional tomatoes used in pico de gallo, which gives the salsa a fruitier and very bright taste. Its texture is maybe *slightly* softer than traditional tomato-based pico. But the plums complemented the duck beautifully. I hope y’all will enjoy these!

Asian Style Duck Tacos with Plum Pico de Gallo

Source: adapted from Dos Caminos Tacos by Ivy Stark

Ingredients:
TACOS:
1 large (1 lb.) duck breast, trimmed of excess skin and fat, patted dry
½ cup red wine (I used a pinot noir)
½ cup soy sauce
2 tbs hoisin sauce
½ tbs freshly squeezed lime juice
½ tsp Sichuan peppercorns
2 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled
1 (2-inch) cinnamon stick, preferably Mexican canela
1 chile de arbol, crumbled or chopped
1 (1-inch) piece of ginger, sliced
¼ medium red onion, coarsely chopped
Slight pinch of kosher salt
4-6 corn tortillas, warmed
Cilantro sprigs, for garnish

PLUM PICO DE GALLO:
½ lb. ripe plums (can be red or black variety), pitted and diced
¼ cup finely diced fresh cilantro
¼ medium red onion, finely chopped
2 tbs finely chopped fresh mint leaves
1 serrano chile, minced (seeded if you want the salsa to be less hot)
1 large garlic clove, minced
½ tbs freshly squeezed lime juice
1 tsp sugar, optional
Kosher salt, to taste

Directions:
Place the duck breast in a large, resealable plastic food storage bag. In a small mixing bowl, combine the red wine, soy sauce, hoisin, lime juice, peppercorns, garlic, cinnamon stick, chile de arbol, ginger, and onion. Pour over the duck breast and close the bag. Massage the bag so that the duck is completely coated in the marinade. Place in the refrigerator and let marinate at least 2 hours and up to overnight.
Get the duck out of the refrigerator 30 minutes before you plan to start cooking so it can come up to room temperature.
Place a 10-inch cast-iron skillet over medium-low heat and let it get as hot as it’s going to get before you start cooking the duck.
Meanwhile, remove the duck from the marinade and wipe off any excess. Using a VERY sharp paring knife, score the skin on the diagonal in one direction, then rotate the duck and score the skin on the diagonal going the other direction, so you have a cross hatch pattern all over the skin. Season very lightly with kosher salt. Place the duck in the cast-iron skillet, skin side down. Cook until the skin is crackly-crispy and the fat has rendered. This will take about 15 minutes total, and you may need to adjust the heat upwards or downwards, depending on how well the fat is rendering. You want it hot enough to do its thing but not hot enough to burn the duck or cook the inside meat too quickly. Periodically you will need to carefully remove the duck with tongs to a cutting board and drain off the rendered fat. If you don’t do this, you’ll be pseudo deep-frying the duck by the end and it will taste greasy.
Once the fat is rendered, flip the duck breast over and cook on the meat side until its internal temperature reads 130 F, about 10 more minutes. Remove the duck to a plate, loosely tent with foil and let rest for at least 5 minutes.
Prepare the PLUM PICO DE GALLO: combine the plums, cilantro, red onion, garlic, mint, serrano chile, lime juice, sugar if using, and salt. Taste for seasoning, as you may need to add more salt. Adjust as necessary.
To assemble, place the duck on a clean cutting board and slice as thinly as possibly across on the diagonal. Place a few duck slices in each tortilla, then spoon on a helping of plum pico de gallo. Garnish with cilantro and serve immediately. Serve the leftover pico de gallo with tortilla chips if you wish.

Chinatown Baby Back Ribs

Chinatown Baby Back Ribs

Whenever Matt and I travel to another city, one of our top priorities is always Find The Chinatown. Every success has richly rewarded us with a delicious meal, and occasionally we’ll conclude that the Chinatown meal was one of the best of the trip. All this hunting may seem silly seeing as we live in a city that boasts not one but two huge Chinatowns (and I somehow managed to live in New York for about five years before I found out about the second one. It’s okay to judge me; I judge me), but I suppose the heart (or in this case the stomach) wants what it wants.

Chinatown Baby Back Ribs

While I do love the bustling, crazy enormity of New York’s Chinatowns, particularly the Manhattan locale, I’ve found that the smaller ones grab me more. My hands down favorite is London. The neighborhood restaurants specialize in duck, and that meal was one of the best I’ve had in my life. (They took a Peking duck, chunked up the meat, then coated it in egg whites and deep fried it, then coated it in some kind of sauce I’d never tasted before. No words for it.)

Chinatown Baby Back Ribs

I also had quite a memorable trip to Boston’s Chinatown, where I ended up attending the University of Humiliating Hard Knocks, majoring in White Girl Doesn’t Know How to Properly Use Chopsticks when I ordered a whole duck leg in broth. Delicious, don’t get me wrong. Also, an embarrassing mess.

Chinatown Baby Back Ribs

I think next time I should stick to ordering these classic Chinese lacquered ribs, which don’t require chopsticks, thus saving my dignity, and my lap! Or, I can practice my chopsticks skills more; or I could just make these at home. The code has been cracked (thank you Steven Raichlen!) – these are authentic and easy and just all around incredible. A wonderful trip down our Chinatown memory lanes. Enjoy!

Chinatown Baby Back Ribs

Source: just slightly adapted from Ribs, Ribs, Outrageous Ribs by Steven Raichlen

Ingredients:
½ cup hoisin sauce
¼ cup granulated sugar
¼ tsp Chinese five-spice powder
¼ cup soy sauce
2 ½ tbs Chinese rice wine or dry sherry
1 ½ tbs Asian dark sesame oil
3 garlic cloves, peeled and gently crushed
3 slices fresh ginger, peeled and gently crushed
2 scallions, thinly sliced, white and green parts divided
1 rack pork baby back ribs, trimmed

Directions:
Place the hoisin, sugar, and five-spice powder in a nonreactive mixing bowl and whisk to mix. Add the soy sauce, rice wine or sherry, and sesame oil and whisk until the sugar dissolves. Stir in the garlic, ginger, and scallion whites. Set one-third of the marinade aside to make the sauce.
Place the ribs in a nonreactive roasting pan or baking dish just large enough to hold them. Pour the remaining marinade over the ribs and spread it all over the rack with a spatula. Turn to coat both sides. Let the ribs marinate, covered, in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours and as long as overnight, turning them 3 or 4 times. Alternately, you can marinate your ribs in a large resealable plastic food storage bag.
Set up your grill for indirect grilling and preheat to medium. Place a drip pan in the center of the grill under the grate.
When ready to cook, brush and oil the grill grate. Drain the ribs well and place them in the center of the grate bone side down over the drip pan and away from the heat. Cover the grill and cook the ribs until dark brown and very crisp on the outside but tender inside, 1 ½ to 2 hours. When the ribs are done, the meat will have shrunk back from the ends of the bones by about ¼ inch.
Meanwhile, transfer the reserved marinade to a nonreactive saucepan, let come to a gentle simmer over medium heat, and cook until thick and flavorful, about 3-5 minutes. Let the sauce cool to room temperature, then strain it into a bowl. In the last 15 minutes of cooking the ribs, baste the meat side with some of the sauce to let it laquer up while they finish cooking.
When the ribs are done, transfer them to a cutting board and let rest a few minutes. Use a serrated knife to cut the rack into individual ribs. Brush with a little more of the sauce, then sprinkle the scallion greens on top for garnish. Serve immediately with the reserved sauce.

Banh Mi Meatball Salad

Banh Mi Meatball Salad

Today continues my themed week on the blog of turning classic dishes into dinner salads, it’s been so much fun for me! I hope y’all have enjoyed it too. What’s next? A banh mi. Oh yes.

Read up on the origins of a banh mi here, where I posted the original, which is a sandwich. And one of the best sandwiches on planet earth, I might add. I never had one until my early thirties, but it’s pretty much one of the best things I’ve ever tasted. So last summer I purchased Mark Bittman’s The VB6 Cookbook, and upon flipping through it I came upon an entry entitled “Banh Mi Meatball Salad.” Oh, I cannot tell you how excited I then became, and somehow it’s taken me this many months to actually sit down and make the blasted thing.

Banh Mi Meatball Salad

Better late than never – I’m incredibly happy I finally brought this cookbook page to life, as it was everything it promised to be and then some. If you also go completely gaga over banh mi flavors, then you simply MUST make this salad. It tastes precisely as advertised, and each bite just explodes spicy flavor in your mouth!

Banh Mi Meatball Salad

Speaking of spicy… you can tailor the heat to your personal preferences by adjusting the amount of sriracha used. You can make the meatballs themselves without it, for instance. You can add a little less to the mayo, though it’s not much there and I wouldn’t recommend cutting that back. You can also omit the final sriracha drizzle. If you want this to taste very authentic without extra heat, I’d leave the sriracha out of the meatballs and omit the drizzle at the end but keep it in the mayo. But if you’re like me, and can’t think about a banh mi without also dreaming of an overload of sriracha, then please use all of it as directed. You won’t be sorry.

Banh Mi Meatball Salad

This is just absolutely beyond delicious, I hope y’all enjoy it!

{One Year Ago: Hot and Sticky Slow Cooker Chicken Wings}
{Two Years Ago: Blood Orange-Braised Pork Shoulder}

Source: slightly adapted from The VB6 Cookbook by Mark Bittman

Ingredients:
1/3 cup rice vinegar
1 tsp honey
1 tsp kosher salt, plus more to taste
1 medium carrot, peeled and coarsely grated
¼ of a large daikon, peeled and julienned
½ medium red onion, thinly sliced
About ½ a baguette, cut into 1-inch cubes
Olive oil
1 lb. ground sirloin
1 tbs minced garlic
1 tbs plus 2 tsp sriracha, plus more for drizzling, divided
Fresh cracked black pepper
1 tbs fish sauce
1 large heart romaine lettuce, coarsely chopped
1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved or quartered if large
½ a large cucumber, seeded and chopped
2 tbs mayonnaise
1 handful each of fresh mint and fresh cilantro, minced
Lime wedges, for serving

Directions:
First you will need to quickly pickle your vegetables. Whisk the vinegar, honey, and ½ tsp salt together in a medium bowl. Add the carrots, daikon, and onion and toss gently. Refrigerate at least 30 minutes; stir occasionally to evenly distribute the brine.
Preheat your oven to 450 F. Place the cubed baguette on a baking sheet and drizzle with a little bit of olive oil. Lightly season with kosher salt and black pepper to taste. Toss with your hands. Shake the pan so that the bread is in a single layer, then toast in the oven for 5-10 minutes, until lightly browned and crispy. Remove the croutons from the oven and transfer to a plate or bowl. Carefully dust off any crumbs from the baking sheet, then spray it generously with cooking spray.
In a large bowl, combine the beef, garlic up to 1 tbs sriracha if desired, black pepper to taste, fish sauce, and ¼ tsp kosher salt. Gently shape the meat mixture into 16 evenly sized meatballs and transfer each to the greased baking sheet, making sure to space them evenly apart so they are not touching. Bake the meatballs, undisturbed, until browned and just cooked through, 8-12 minutes. Let them cool a bit while you assemble the salad.
At this point, add the mayonnaise and 2 tsp sriracha to the pickled vegetables and stir to combine thoroughly.
In a large salad bowl, add the romaine, cherry tomatoes, and cucumber. Add the pickled dressed vegetables and toss to combine and dress the salad. Add the croutons and toss gently again. Divide the salad among dinner plates and top with 4 meatballs apiece. Drizzle with sriracha if desired, then garnish with the herbs and lime wedges. Serve immediately.
Makes 4 servings.

Mark Bittman’s Veggie Fried Noodles

Mark Bittman's Veggie Fried noodles 5027

Secret Recipe Club reveal day is here!! This month I was assigned Tea and Scones, which is a baking blog that certainly lives up to its name. Many, many beautiful and drool-worthy scones recipes featured. And given my love of scones, you’d think I would have picked one to make, right?

Mark Bittman's veggie fried noodles 4998

Well, I strongly considered it, believe me. Very, very tempted. But, I have been striving to eat much healthier the past few months, so when I also ran across this Mark Bittman recipe, which is incredibly healthy yet uber-delicious, well, I was sold.

Mark Bittman's Veggie fried noodles 5015

Once I reach my goal weight, I’m coming back to make one of your scones! I’m a huge fan of Mark Bittman, too, so I was very excited to see this recipe. I love that we’re using soba noodles instead of rice – nice creative twist there – and that this recipe fit perfectly with my current eating habits. And the dish was truly wonderful. It didn’t feel like a “healthy” dish, if that makes sense, it was just some good, clean eating. Very filling and satisfying, and one I would definitely make again.

Mark Bittman's Veggie Fried Noodles 5020

Definitely check out Tea and Scones, y’all! Enjoy!

{One Year Ago: Caramel Apple Layer Cake, Philly Strip Steaks with Provolone Sauce and Caramelized Onions}

Source: Tea and Scones

Ingredients:
8 ounces buckwheat (soba) noodles
1 tablespoon sesame oil
2 tablespoons canola oil
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon minced ginger
1 cup chopped green onions
2 large carrots chopped
3 celery stalks, chopped
2 cups snow peas, or sugar snap peas, cut into halves or thirds crosswise
1/4 cup chicken stock or water (more if you need it, I didn’t.)
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 egg, beaten
black pepper
1/4 cups chopped peanuts for garnish

Directions:
Bring a large pot of water to a boil and salt it. Cook the noodles according to package directions, but make sure they don’t get mushy. Drain the noodles and rinse under cold water. Toss them with sesame oil to prevent sticking.
While the noodles are cooking, heat the canola oil in a large, deep skillet or a wok over medium-high heat. Add garlic, ginger, and scallions. Cook for about 15 seconds.
Add the carrots, celery, snow peas, and stock or water and turn the heat to high. Cook, stirring frequently, until the vegetables are tender, about 5-10 minutes. If the mixture gets too dry, add more liquid a tablespoon at a time.
Stir in soy sauce and beaten egg(s) and let the egg lightly scramble in the pan. Add the noodles, sprinkle with pepper, and toss well. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Garnish with the peanuts and serve.


Mango Peanut Slaw #SundaySupper

Mango Peanut Slaw 057

Happy Sunday Supper everyone! Today’s theme is Summer BBQ Party – a wonderful theme since I think we can all agree that summer bbq parties (or summer cook-outs, whichever nomenclature you prefer) are one of the most fun things ever. Growing up, such parties were a fixture on the calendar. Sometimes my parents were hosting, sometimes we were guests, but it seemed like there was one on the schedule almost every weekend of the summer. And they’re such a blast.

making mango slaw 040

I chose to make this delicious side dish for three reasons: 1) coleslaw of some kind is a summer bbq staple everywhere; 2) seeing as this is Asian-flavored, it’s a little bit outside the box for your typical American summer bbq, which appealed to me; and 3) it uses mangos, which are beautifully in season in my area right now, and I’m trying to use up all the summer produce I can, while I still can.

mango peanut slaw 045

But I’m actually trying to use all that summer produce in some savory dishes for once. I usually bake desserts or sweet breakfast goods with it, which is always delicious, of course. But this summer I wanted to challenge myself to find more savory uses for this luscious summer produce. Not that there won’t also be sweets on the blog this summer. I mean, please…

Mango peanut slaw 047

So y’all enjoy this delicious, spicy, summer-bbq-worthy slaw, and do not forget to check out all the loveliness from my Sunday Supper gang! Enjoy!

Mango Peanut slaw 070

Source: adapted from Man Made Meals by Steven Raichlen

Ingredients:
2 generous tbs sambal chile paste, or to taste
1 clove garlic, peeled and minced
3 tbs sugar
½ tsp freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup fresh lime juice
¼ cup Asian fish sauce or soy sauce
1 small (about 1 lb.) head green cabbage
1 ripe mango
18 slender green beans (hericots verts)
½ cup coarsely chopped cilantro
1/3 cup coarsely chopped dry-roasted peanuts, salted or unsalted

Directions:
First make the dressing: in a large mixing bowl, whisk together the sambal, garlic, sugar, black pepper, and fish sauce. Set aside.
Split the cabbage into quarters, and core each section. Thinly slice it with a sharp knife, or I prefer a mandoline slicer. Peel and pit the mango, then slice it into thin strips. To the bowl with the dressing, add the cabbage, mango, green beans, and cilantro. Toss well to combine. Garnish with the peanuts and serve.

Beverages

Appetizers

Sides and Accompaniments

Main Dishes

Desserts

Sunday Supper MovementJoin the #SundaySupper conversation on twitter on Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. To get more great Sunday Supper Recipes, visit our website or check out our Pinterest board.

Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement.

Chicken Stir-Fry in Lettuce Cups + A Cookbook Giveaway!!!

Chicken Stir-Fry in Lettuce Cups 019

Alright, guys – my giveaway is ending tomorrow at 5 pm EST! Get yourself entered to win my excess copy of “The VB6 Cookbook” by Mark Bittman! I’ve been showing you recipes from the book all week, and this one is a real gem in the flavor department.

chicken stir-fry in lettuce cups 001

For anyone unfamiliar with Bittman’s story, I’ll summarize it quickly for you: a few years ago he found himself at his doctor’s office, not insignificantly overweight and with his blood test numbers (cholesterol, blood sugar) on the high side. His doctor told him he needed to make some major changes to his overall diet, which initially didn’t sound too appealing to Bittman. I mean, the guy has a career in food. So after some research and pondering the situation quite a bit, Bittman decided he could compromise on his diet: before 6 pm (dinnertime) he eats vegan, with no refined sugar or flour. After 6 pm, he can eat whatever he wants, but he does try to keep things on the leaner side (most of the time).

Chicken stir-fry in lettuce cups 008

So the recipes in this book are presented as vegan breakfasts, vegan lunches, vegan snacks, non-vegan dinners, and then desserts. Today I’m sharing a non-vegan dinner, one that Matt and I absolutely loved. I love stir-fries anyway, but this one really endeared itself me to it when it used chicken thighs, which I adore, but I’ll tell ya – that sriracha mayo is what really makes it. That was so delicious.

Chicken Stir-Fry in lettuce cups 014

I hope y’all will enjoy this one! And don’t forget to enter the giveaway, and this book could be yours – there’s still some time!

Chicken stir-fry in Lettuce cups 026

{One Year Ago: Spaghetti Aglio e Olio}

Source: slightly adapted from The VB6 Cookbook by Mark Bittman

Ingredients:
1 head of bibb or Boston lettuce
2 tbs vegetable oil
About 1 lb. boneless, skinless chicken thighs, chopped
Kosher salt and fresh cracked black pepper, to taste
2 tbs minced garlic
1 tbs minced fresh ginger
1 bunch scallions, whites and green parts separated, chopped
1 large carrot, peeled and coarsely grated
¼ lb. sugar snap peas or snow peas, chopped
½ lb. shiitake mushrooms, thinly sliced
¼ cup chicken stock or water
2 tbs soy sauce
¼ cup mayonnaise
2 tbs fresh lime juice
2 tbs sriracha, or to taste

Directions:
Core the lettuce and separate it into as many individual leaves as possible. Rinse and wrap them in towels. Refrigerate until needed.
Put a wok or large skillet over high heat. Add 1 tbs oil, swirl it around, and immediately add the chicken. Sprinkle it with salt and pepper. Cook undisturbed until the pieces brown and can be stirred easily without sticking. Stir the chicken around to start cooking the other sides, then add the garlic and ginger. Stir frequently until the chicken is no longer pink and the veggies have softened, about 3-5 minutes total. Transfer the chicken mixture to a plate. Set aside.
Add the remaining 1 tbs oil to the wok or skillet along with the white parts of the scallions, and cook, stirring occasionally and adjusting the heat to avoid burning, until they turn golden, 2-3 minutes. Add the remaining veggies except for the scallions greens. Cook, stirring frequently, until they are tender-crisp, about 5 minutes.
Return the chicken mixture to the pan along with any accumulated juices. Now add the stock, soy sauce and scallion greens. Cook and stir about 1 more minute, scraping up any browned bits from the bottom of the skillet. If it isn’t saucy at all, add a touch more stock to help it out. But remember, you are putting this in a lettuce cup you’ll be eating with your hands, so it may be unpleasant to have the stir-fry be too liquid-y. I found mine was perfect without adding any extra.
Turn the heat to very low and let it hang out a minute while you make the mayonnaise. In a small bowl, whisk the mayonnaise, lime juice and sriracha together until smooth. Taste for seasoning and add more hot sauce if desired.
To serve, gently fill a lettuce cup with stir-fry, then drizzle the mayonnaise on top, as liberally or as conservatively as your desire. Eat immediately or the lettuce gets soggy.

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Soy-Ginger Salmon over Asian Veggie Noodles

Soy salmon over Asian veggie noodles

Continuing our theme this week of Pasta with Seafood, we have a delicious, healthy, flavorful, Asian salmon dish, that essentially got made because I’m trying to clean out my pantry and I ran across a half-used box of dried spaghetti. Score!

Did I mention this is delicious? Because it really was… soooo good. Clean flavors, perfectly cooked salmon that just melted in your mouth, and salty, chewy noodles. So awesome.

I used my wok for this, which worked beautifully, but any high sided skillet will do. This cooks up so friggin’ fast, which is great for a weeknight meal, but I highly advise having all the prep work done ahead of time and definitely do not walk away in the middle of this. I would also caution against marinating the salmon much more than the 5 minutes called for. There’s a bit of acid in the marinade, and if left to its own devices for too long, the acid will start to “cook” the fish, and then when you try to cook it yourself in the pan, the final product will be mushy. And no one wants that.

soy salmon over Asian veggie noodles

I also only call for cooking the salmon about 3-4 minutes per side, because I am so picky about the way salmon is cooked. I like mine to be between medium-rare and medium. To my personal palate, if salmon goes beyond medium, it just tastes like cat food. And if I wanted cat food, I’d go down to my local Petland and buy some salmon cat food for a lot less money than I spent on these beautiful wild-caught fillets. But that’s possibly just me. Of course feel free to cook it to your desired preference.

Soy Salmon over Asian Veggie Noodles

Anyways, enjoy this one, guys!

{One year ago: Malted Chocolate Ice Cream}

Source: adapted from Express Lane Meals by Rachael Ray

Ingredients:
½ lb. dried spaghetti
Kosher salt
6 tbs soy sauce or tamari
1-2 inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and grated
Juice of 1 lime
¼ tsp crushed chili flakes
4 salmon fillets
Vegetable or olive oil
½ a small head of green cabbage, cored and sliced very thin (I used a handheld mandoline slicer on its thickest setting)
1 large carrot, peeled and grated
1 red bell pepper, seeded and sliced thinly
5 garlic cloves, minced
4 scallions, trimmed, chopped, green and white parts divided
2 tsp sugar
¾ cup chicken stock

Directions:
Place a large stockpot of water over high heat. Cover and let it come up to a boil. Generously salt the boiling water, then drop in the pasta. Cook according to package directions for al dente. Drain thoroughly when done.
Meanwhile, combine the tamari, ginger, lime juice, and chili flakes in a small baking dish or shallow bowl. Add the salmon fillets skin side up. Let marinate for 5 minutes.
Preheat a wok or high-sided skillet over high heat. Add a few drizzles of oil, then place the salmon in the wok skin side down. Don’t discard the marinade! Cook 3-4 minutes per side, or longer if you desire. When the salmon is done, remove to a plate and cover loosely with aluminum foil.
Wipe out the wok and return it to high heat. Add another drizzle of oil, then add the cabbage, carrot, and bell pepper. Sauté until the veggies have softened and wilted a bit, about 3-4 minutes. Add the garlic and white parts of the scallions and cook 1 minute more.
Add the sugar to the marinade and stir to combine. Then add the marinade to the wok. Let it simmer about 1 minute. Now add the chicken stock and let it simmer 2-3 minutes. Then add the cooked, drained pasta to the wok and toss to combine.
Pile some veggie noodles onto each plate and then position a salmon fillet over top. Garnish with the green parts of the scallions. Serve immediately.
As written, this will serve 4 people. Since I’m only cooking for two, I just made 2 salmon fillets, but kept the marinade amounts as written, and made the noodles as written, and the leftover veggie noodles are delicious!