Tag Archives: Duck

Dirty Wild Rice with Duck Bacon, Pecans, and Bourbon Sauce

Dirty Wild Rice with Duck Bacon, Pecans, and Bourbon Sauce

Matt and I have been on many, many dates in our thirteen years together (thirteen years, I still can’t believe it!!), but one that particularly stands out to me happened several years ago on Valentine’s Day. He took me to Bar Americain, one of Bobby Flay’s high end restaurants, and I guess because it was Valentine’s Day, I was anticipating a lowly-lit, slightly secluded, quiet and romantic experience.

Dirty Wild Rice with Duck Bacon, Pecans, and Bourbon Sauce

Yeah, not so much! The restaurant’s seating is very New York (read: close together), and the place was absolutely packed that night. We were led to a two-seater table, sitting facing one another, with barely enough room for a small purse between myself and the next two-seater table. All was not lost though. What made the entire night incredibly entertaining, albeit not terribly romantic, is that the couple seated next to us was this elderly man and woman who were having a very spirited argument about the finer details and overall merits of The Real Housewives of … somewhere, I forgot which city.

Dirty Wild Rice with Duck Bacon, Pecans, and Bourbon Sauce

Matt and I gave up on any romantic conversation and instead had fun listening to this couple go at each other’s throats about such a banal topic. Oh, and the food was good too!

What I’m sharing today is what Matt ordered that night, or more accurately, a streamlined version of it, seeing as my home kitchen is not a Bobby Flay restaurant. I’m happy to report that I still got the point across though. This is a play on the New Orleans dish dirty rice, which is typically made with white rice, but Flay twists it up with a combination of Arborio rice and wild rice. Quite delicious! In his restaurant he pairs this with seared duck breast, but I slimmed it down to some duck bacon lardons scattered over the rice, thus keeping the meal to less food overall, plus this let the dirty rice be the star of the plate. You can sub regular pork bacon or even turkey bacon if you can’t find duck bacon.

Dirty Wild Rice with Duck Bacon, Pecans, and Bourbon Sauce

Even with a few changes, this really does taste restaurant quality, and happily reminded Matt of our date years ago. Which was the goal, so that was nice. I highly recommend for a lovely date night at home! Enjoy!

dirty wild rice with duck bacon, pecans and bourbon sauce

Source: adapted from Bobby Flay’s Bar Americain Cookbook by Bobby Flay

Ingredients:
1 quart chicken stock
1 package (8-12 oz.) duck bacon, chopped into lardons
Olive oil, as needed
½ lb. chicken livers
Kosher salt and black pepper
1 tbs unsalted butter
1 stalk celery, finely diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 jalapeno chiles, diced, seeded if desired
1 yellow bell pepper, roasted, peeled, seeded, and diced
1 red bell pepper, roasted, peeled, seeded, and diced
1 cup Arborio rice
1 cup cooked wild rice
2 tbs chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
2 tsp chopped fresh thyme
2 tbs pure maple syrup
¼ cup pecans, toasted and chopped
1 cup bourbon
2-3 whole thyme sprigs
2 tbs cold butter, cut into cubes
Louisiana style hot sauce, for passing at the table

Directions:
Pour the chicken stock into a small stockpot and keep warm over low heat. Set aside.
In a large, high-sided skillet, add the duck bacon lardons over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring until the fat has rendered and the lardons are crisped. Remove to a paper towel lined plate with a slotted spoon.
Pat the chicken livers dry with a paper towel, then season them with salt and pepper to taste. Add olive oil to the skillet if needed (you may have enough fat from the bacon). Add the chicken livers over high heat and cook, turning once, until golden brown and cooked to medium, about 5 minutes. Remove to a cutting board, let cool until you can handle them, then coarsely chop. It’s okay if there’s still a little bit of pink on the insides. Set aside.
Turn the skillet to medium heat and add the butter. Add the celery, garlic, and jalapenos and cook until soft, about 4 minutes. Add the roasted peppers and cook 1 minute. Now add the Arborio rice, stir and cook 1 minute.
Begin adding the warmed stock to the skillet, ½ cup at a time, stirring constantly until absorbed. Continue adding stock and stirring until the rice is al dente, about 20 minutes. You may not need all of the stock.
Now stir in the wild rice, chicken livers, parsley, thyme, and maple syrup. Let it heat through, about 2-3 minutes. Taste for seasoning and add salt and pepper if needed.
Meanwhile, pour the bourbon into a small saucepan or stockpot, add the whole thyme sprigs, and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce by at least half, until it has thickened a bit to a sauce consistency. Add the cold butter, one piece at a time, until it melts. Shut off the heat and remove the thyme.
To serve, transfer the rice to a large serving bowl. Scatter the pecans and reserved duck bacon over top. Spoon into bowls and drizzle with bourbon sauce. Pass the hot sauce if desired.

Duck Chorizo Tacos with Brussels Sprouts Slaw

Duck Chorizo Tacos with Brussels Sprouts Slaw

I made my first batch of homemade fresh chorizo about three years ago, and I haven’t looked back once. The homemade is infinitely superior to the store-bought taste-wise, and no scary-sounding, unpronounceable ingredients either. Chorizo is almost exclusively made from pork shoulder (or so I thought!), and that cut is fatty enough that you don’t really need to hunt down fatback. Although you can, and it’s fantastic that way too!

Duck Chorizo Tacos with Brussels Sprouts Slaw

But, like I said, I had always thought pork had the market cornered on chorizo, only to find out I was happily mistaken – duck chorizo is a thing! So when Fresh Direct sent me a duck breast that was misshapen and didn’t look all that great for searing and slicing, I decided to run it through the meat grinder and try my hand at some duck chorizo.

Duck Chorizo Tacos with Brussels Sprouts Slaw

Wow. Yeah. It’s phenomenal! I opted for tacos, and I wanted to keep the tacos themselves on the simple side to really showcase the chorizo. So I’d been thinking a cabbage slaw, but saw these giant Brussels sprouts at the market and since Brussels sprouts are little cabbages, I decided to try it.

Duck Chorizo Tacos with Brussels Sprouts Slaw

As duck chorizo is and very well should be a thing, so should Brussels sprouts slaw. It was really fantastic! A tad more flavor than regular green cabbage, but it definitely didn’t overpower the duck flavor. This is definitely a repeat-worthy meal here. Enjoy!

Duck Chorizo Tacos with Brussels Sprouts Slaw

Source: Duck Chorizo is from Harold Dieterle’s Kitchen Notebook by Harold Dieterle; the rest is from yours truly

Ingredients:

CHORIZO:
1 lb. ground duck, doesn’t matter what cut just make sure the skin and fat is ground along with the meat
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 tbs sweet paprika
4 tsp chili powder
2 tbs ground fennel
2 tsp dried oregano
2 tbs sherry vinegar
Kosher salt

SLAW:
4 giant Brussels sprouts or their equivalent, trimmed, halved, and very thinly sliced across
Juice of half a lime
Kosher salt and black pepper
Slight drizzle of olive oil

8 corn tortillas, warmed
Minced cilantro, for garnish
Crumbled Cotija cheese, for garnish

Directions:
To make the CHORIZO, place the duck, garlic, paprika, chili powder, fennel, oregano, sherry vinegar, and kosher salt to taste in a large bowl. Stir to incorporate, then refrigerate for 4 to 6 hours.
Right before you’re ready to cook the chorizo, make the SLAW. Add the shredded Brussels sprouts to a mixing bowl and add the lime juice, plus salt and pepper to taste. Mix well and set aside until serving.
Place a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add a slight drizzle of olive oil (the duck has plenty of fat!) and once it’s hot, add the duck. Cook, crumbling with a spoon and stirring, until the duck is cooked through. Let cool just slightly before assembling the tacos.
To assemble the tacos, fill a warmed tortilla with the duck chorizo, then top with slaw and garnish as you like it – I kept mine simple with a little minced cilantro and crumbled Cotija cheese. Serve immediately.

Turducken Lasagna

Turducken Lasagna

Every year, I love roasting a turkey for the blog sometime in early November. And this year was no exception. Unfortunately, this year, the turkey did not love me back! First of all, I tried a newfangled type of stuffing-something-flavorful-under-the-skin technique featuring sausage and polenta. Don’t do this. The polenta is not firm enough to stay there.

Turducken Lasagna

Secondly, spatchcocking turkey, also known as butterflying, seems to be all the rage this year, so I thought I’d give it a go. Just, no. If you go this direction, please have your butcher do it. I nearly ruined my kitchen shears and no matter what I did I couldn’t properly break the breast bone. A completely useless waste of time.

Turducken Lasagna

So the bad news is that I have no turkey to share with you this year. The good news is that I’m offering you a main dish alternative for your Thanksgiving Day dinner for those of you who have tired of roasting birds and want a new spin on things.

Turducken Lasagna

This is a play on that freakish concoction otherwise known as Turducken, a scary monstrosity created by wrapping a chicken inside of a duck inside of a turkey. Honestly, it’s never appealed to me in the least. I just can’t. But lasagna – lasagna I can! This is one of the better-tasting and more special lasagnas I’ve made. It begins with equal parts of ground turkey, ground duck, and ground chicken that makes a flavorful, interesting and pleasantly gamey meat sauce that becomes part of a pretty traditional Italian style lasagna. We were so in love. Seriously, no one would miss a turkey if you served this on Thanksgiving.

Turducken Lasagna

A few recipe notes: it doesn’t matter what cut of duck you grind. Just grind the fat and skin along with the meat (or have your butcher do it). Use all dark turkey and chicken meat, or at least a combination of dark and white. All-white meat grinds will be too dry. I hope you enjoy it!

Source: slightly adapted from Harold Dieterle’s Kitchen Notebook by Harold Dieterle

Ingredients:
2 tbs olive oil
8 oz. ground turkey
8 oz. ground duck (any parts)
8 oz. ground chicken
Kosher salt and black pepper
1 large Spanish onion, minced
10 garlic cloves, minced
2 tbs fennel seeds
1 tbs crushed red pepper flakes
28 oz. can crushed tomatoes
15 oz. can crushed tomatoes
28 oz. can tomato puree
15 oz. can tomato puree
Leaves from 1 bunch of basil, loosely torn
1 lb. mozzarella cheese, grated
1 lb. provolone cheese, grated
1 cup grated pecorino romano cheese
1 to 1 1/2 lbs. no-boil lasagna noodles
3 lbs. ricotta cheese

Directions:
First, make the sauce. Heat the oil in a large, high-sided skillet or saucepan over high heat. When the oil is shimmering, add the ground turkey, duck, and chicken and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring and breaking up the meat, until the meat is lightly browned and no traces of pink remain, about 6 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate.
Add the onion, garlic, fennel, and red pepper flakes to the pan and cook, stirring, until the onion is softened but not browned, about 2 minutes. Return the meat to the pan and stir in all the crushed tomatoes and all the tomato puree. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Bring the sauce to a simmer, then continue to simmer for 40 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the basil.
Now assemble the lasagna: preheat your oven to 350 F. Place the mozzarella, provolone, and pecorino in a bowl and fold them together. Ladle one-quarter of the sauce into the bottom of a very large lasagna pan, spreading it to all the corners.
Top with a layer of noodles, breaking to fit if necessary. Spread about one-quarter of the ricotta over the noodles, then about one-quarter of the mozzarella cheese mixture. Repeat, starting with the sauce, three more times, and finishing with the mozzarella mixture. Grind black pepper over the top of the lasagna. Cover with aluminum foil, then bake until the cheese is melted and bubbly and you can pierce the center of the lasagna easily with a paring knife, about 45 minutes. Remove the foil and return to the oven to bake until the cheese starts to brown, about 5 more minutes. Remove the lasagna from the oven and set aside to rest for 20 minutes. Slice and serve.

Asian-Style Duck Tacos with Plum Pico de Gallo

Asian Style Duck Tacos with Plum Pico de Gallo

I think most of us in the US would agree that peaches tend to be the heavyweight champions of stone fruit season. But if that’s indeed true, then I’d say that plums are the minor league champs, and deserve their day in the spotlight. And I for one get very excited when these underrated champs reach their peak high season! My local grocery store has them on full display, right there on the sidewalk, both black and red varieties looking proud, plump, and delicious.

black plums

I knew I wanted a savory application for the beauties, and thanks to me buying twice as many corn tortillas than I needed last weekend, tacos began to make a lot of sense. (Due to the excess of corn tortillas, we’ve actually been eating a LOT of tacos around here lately).

plum pico de gallo

I must admit, I’ve never before warmed to the idea of “fusion tacos” – but, well, when you’re eating as many tacos as we have been lately, the idea starts sounding better and better. So that’s where Asian style duck tacos come into play. These are reminiscent of a Peking duck. They marinate in a basic Chinese style combination of garlic, ginger, soy, and hoisin.

Asian Style Duck Tacos with Plum Pico de Gallo

The plums actually stand in for, rather than accompany, the traditional tomatoes used in pico de gallo, which gives the salsa a fruitier and very bright taste. Its texture is maybe *slightly* softer than traditional tomato-based pico. But the plums complemented the duck beautifully. I hope y’all will enjoy these!

Asian Style Duck Tacos with Plum Pico de Gallo

Source: adapted from Dos Caminos Tacos by Ivy Stark

Ingredients:
TACOS:
1 large (1 lb.) duck breast, trimmed of excess skin and fat, patted dry
½ cup red wine (I used a pinot noir)
½ cup soy sauce
2 tbs hoisin sauce
½ tbs freshly squeezed lime juice
½ tsp Sichuan peppercorns
2 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled
1 (2-inch) cinnamon stick, preferably Mexican canela
1 chile de arbol, crumbled or chopped
1 (1-inch) piece of ginger, sliced
¼ medium red onion, coarsely chopped
Slight pinch of kosher salt
4-6 corn tortillas, warmed
Cilantro sprigs, for garnish

PLUM PICO DE GALLO:
½ lb. ripe plums (can be red or black variety), pitted and diced
¼ cup finely diced fresh cilantro
¼ medium red onion, finely chopped
2 tbs finely chopped fresh mint leaves
1 serrano chile, minced (seeded if you want the salsa to be less hot)
1 large garlic clove, minced
½ tbs freshly squeezed lime juice
1 tsp sugar, optional
Kosher salt, to taste

Directions:
Place the duck breast in a large, resealable plastic food storage bag. In a small mixing bowl, combine the red wine, soy sauce, hoisin, lime juice, peppercorns, garlic, cinnamon stick, chile de arbol, ginger, and onion. Pour over the duck breast and close the bag. Massage the bag so that the duck is completely coated in the marinade. Place in the refrigerator and let marinate at least 2 hours and up to overnight.
Get the duck out of the refrigerator 30 minutes before you plan to start cooking so it can come up to room temperature.
Place a 10-inch cast-iron skillet over medium-low heat and let it get as hot as it’s going to get before you start cooking the duck.
Meanwhile, remove the duck from the marinade and wipe off any excess. Using a VERY sharp paring knife, score the skin on the diagonal in one direction, then rotate the duck and score the skin on the diagonal going the other direction, so you have a cross hatch pattern all over the skin. Season very lightly with kosher salt. Place the duck in the cast-iron skillet, skin side down. Cook until the skin is crackly-crispy and the fat has rendered. This will take about 15 minutes total, and you may need to adjust the heat upwards or downwards, depending on how well the fat is rendering. You want it hot enough to do its thing but not hot enough to burn the duck or cook the inside meat too quickly. Periodically you will need to carefully remove the duck with tongs to a cutting board and drain off the rendered fat. If you don’t do this, you’ll be pseudo deep-frying the duck by the end and it will taste greasy.
Once the fat is rendered, flip the duck breast over and cook on the meat side until its internal temperature reads 130 F, about 10 more minutes. Remove the duck to a plate, loosely tent with foil and let rest for at least 5 minutes.
Prepare the PLUM PICO DE GALLO: combine the plums, cilantro, red onion, garlic, mint, serrano chile, lime juice, sugar if using, and salt. Taste for seasoning, as you may need to add more salt. Adjust as necessary.
To assemble, place the duck on a clean cutting board and slice as thinly as possibly across on the diagonal. Place a few duck slices in each tortilla, then spoon on a helping of plum pico de gallo. Garnish with cilantro and serve immediately. Serve the leftover pico de gallo with tortilla chips if you wish.

Duck Confit Over Bulgur Wheat with Mango “Gin-Ger” Sauce

Duck Confit over Bulgur Wheat with Mango "Gin-Ger" Sauce

Yesterday I showed you an amazing DIY shortcut to making your own duck confit, and I figure it would be rather uncouth of me to not turn around and give you a recipe for utilizing said duck confit. So here I am.

This recipe… this is one of those where you sit down, take your first bite and then go, “Holy %$#! did that really come out of my kitchen?! Did I just MAKE this?” And then you realize that yes, yes you did just make this stellar, amazing meal that you’d happily fork over at least $35 to eat in a fancy restaurant. And honestly, it wasn’t even that difficult to pull off!

Duck Confit over Bulgur Wheat with Mango "Gin-Ger" Sauce

This meal is truly superlative and guaranteed to impress. This is what you make your significant other’s parents who think you aren’t good enough for their precious little snowflake. This is how you blow away your foodiest of foodie friends. This is how you seal the deal for a second date.

Duck Confit over Bulgur Wheat with Mango "Gin-Ger" Sauce

I seriously could not believe this came out of my kitchen. It is spectacular. The flavors are beautiful and cohesive, and the duck confit, that you made yourself, is such a star here. The slight gamey flavor of the bird plays beautifully with the sweet mango sauce and the nutty chew of the bulgur wheat. It’s just AMAZING.

Duck Confit over Bulgur Wheat with Mango "Gin-Ger" Sauce

Make it this weekend. Thank me later. The end.

{One Year Ago: Red Wine Beef and Swiss Chard Stew}

Source: slightly adapted from Harold Dieterle’s Kitchen Notebook by Harold Dieterle

Ingredients:
4 pieces of duck confit, leg and thigh attached
½ cup bulgur wheat
Kosher salt and black pepper
2 ¼ cups sherry vinegar
½ cup sugar
¼ cup gin
1 cup diced mango, half pureed until smooth
4 tbs unsalted butter, cut into pieces
2-3 tbs peeled, grated fresh ginger
½ cup chopped fresh celery
½ cup chopped roasted Brazil nuts
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 tbs minced shallot

Directions:
First, cook the bulgur wheat: put the wheat in a medium, heatproof bowl. Bring 1 cup of water to a boil, then pour it over the wheat. Add a pinch of salt and black pepper, stir, and cover with plastic wrap. Set aside for 20 minutes. Fluff the wheat with a fork and strain off any excess water. Allow it to cool to room temperature while you prepare the rest of the dish.
To make the mango sauce: cook 2 cups of vinegar and the sugar in a saucepan over medium-high heat, whisking, until the sugar has dissolved and the mixture is reduced by half, about 5 minutes. Stir in the gin and mango puree. Simmer until reduced by half, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, then fold in the diced mango, butter, and ginger.
Warm the duck legs if they have been chilled.
Add the celery, Brazil nuts, remaining ¼ cup vinegar, extra-virgin olive oil, and shallot to the bulgur wheat. Season to taste with salt and pepper and gently toss.
To serve, spoon the bulgur wheat onto 4 dinner plates. Lay 1 duck confit piece over the wheat, then finish with mango sauce to taste.

Counterfeit Duck Confit

Counterfeit Duck Confit

I recently read a most excellent book entitled French Women Don’t Get Fat. Its perfectly genius ideas, many of which I have successfully incorporated into my lifestyle resulting in a weight loss of around 40 pounds (though I don’t know exactly because French women do not weigh themselves!) make me yearn to visit Paris again. Since that isn’t really on the horizon for a multitude of boring reasons (work, finances, yada yada), I’ve made do with delving into French cuisine at home.

Counterfeit Duck Confit

Much of French cuisine is ubiquitous enough that even a girl growing up in Dallas, Texas in the ‘80’s is familiar, but one thing I never even knew about, let alone tasted until adulthood, is duck confit.

Duck confit. It’s the most delicious, superlative, food-gasmic thing, ever. What is it, exactly? It’s duck legs cooked slowly in their own fat. The result is perfectly crispy, crackly skin encasing fall-off-the-bone dark duck meat. The actual cooking is a bit of a production and requires one to buy copious amounts of duck fat, an item that can be difficult to locate for some, and then sometimes insultingly expensive when finally found.

Counterfeit Duck Confit

Luckily for us all, David Lebovitz has gifted us a way to make duck confit in our own kitchens in a quarter of the time and without having to hunt down and purchase that pesky duck fat.* In his version, the duck sits overnight in the refrigerator in a combination of salt, spices and gin, then cooks in a low and slow oven, for only 2 ½ hours, in the fat it renders itself. The result? You can’t tell the difference. You can’t! David is really onto something here. I’m thoroughly impressed by his method, and so grateful to now have this trick in my arsenal. Enjoy, everyone!

Counterfeit Duck Confit

*Disclaimer: I love duck fat. I adore it! So please don’t think I’m maligning it here. It’s just that I’m also spoiled in that I can find it in my regular grocery store. I don’t assume everyone can find it so easily, and calling for duck fat can make a recipe prohibitive for some. If duck fat is easy for you to find, consider using it for potatoes, Chex mix, or cookies!

One Year Ago: Bacon Cinnamon Rolls with Maple Cream Cheese Frosting

Source: My Paris Kitchen by David Lebovitz

Ingredients:
4 whole duck legs (thigh and leg attached)
1 tbs kosher salt
1 tbs gin
¼ tsp ground nutmeg
¼ tsp ground allspice
2 garlic cloves, peeled and halved lengthwise
2 bay leaves

Directions:
Prick the duck skin all over with the tines of a fork, making sure to pierce all the way through the skin.
Mix the salt, gin, nutmeg, and allspice together in a small bowl. Find a baking dish that will fit the duck legs very snugly, with no room around them. For me, it was my standard 8×8” baker. Rub the duck legs all over with the salt mixture. Place the garlic halves and bay leaves on the bottom of the baking dish and lay the duck legs, flesh side down, on top of them. Make sure the garlic cloves are completely buried underneath. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 8 hours and up to overnight.
To cook the duck, wipe the duck gently with a paper towel to remove excess salt, then put the duck back in the dish, skin side up. Place the baking dish in a cold oven. Turn the oven on to 300 F. Bake the duck legs for 2 ½ hours, taking them out twice during baking and basting them with any duck fat pooling around them.
To finish the duck, remove from the oven, then increase the oven temperature to 375 F and bake the duck for 15 to 20 minutes, until the skin is deeply browned and very crispy.

Smoky Scrambled Duck Eggs with Tomatoes on Toast Points

Smoky Scrambled Duck Eggs with Tomatoes on Toast Points 5346

I am so predictable. Really, I am. Every time I get a new cookbook, I make a beeline for any recipe that can even remotely resemble a Tex-Mex dish, and that usually ends up what I make first. And I kid you not, this is every time. And I usually don’t even realize I’m doing it until the meal is on the table.

duck eggs 5300

I mean, seriously, take it from me to buy Plenty, a book by an Israeli-born Londoner, and find one of the *few* Tex-Mex-ish recipes in there to make first. You really wouldn’t even expect such a thing from Ottolenghi, but the man’s genius seems to know no bounds, and yes, he has a sort-of version of migas.

Smoky scrambled duck eggs with tomatoes on toast points 5310

Only he uses duck eggs. (Which you can find at Whole Foods, and no, they are not cheap). I’d never experimented with duck eggs before, and I must say, they are a bit different from chicken eggs. I get why people go gaga over them. They are larger, so you don’t need as many, and they are richer and more luxurious.

Smoky Scrambled Duck eggs and tomatoes on toast points 5327

This dish is great as is of course, but I firmly believe you could use chicken eggs with spectacular results. If you’re looking to get all fancy and impress someone, definitely splurge for the duck eggs, but it’s not wholly necessary. Enjoy!

Smoky Scrambled Duck Eggs with tomatoes on toast points 5337

{One Year Ago: Apple-Pork Ragout over Pappardelle}

Source: adapted from Plenty by Yotam Ottolenghi

Ingredients:
2 dried chipotle chiles, stems removed and seeds shaken out
2 thick slices sourdough bread, regular or whole wheat
Softened butter, for spreading
1 tbs olive oil
2 garlic cloves, sliced
2 scallions, chopped
2 plum tomatoes, seeded and roughly chopped
3 duck eggs, or 4 large chicken eggs
Kosher salt and black pepper, to taste
Handful of cilantro leaves, chopped
Sour cream, for serving

Directions:
Place the dried chipotles in a small stockpot over medium-high heat. Toast for about a minute, flipping once, until you can just smell them. Fill the pot with water and bring to a boil. Once it’s boiling, shut off the heat and cover the pot. Let it sit for 20 minutes. When the chiles have rehydrated and are soft and pliable, transfer them to a cutting board and dice.
Place a large cast-iron skillet over medium to medium-high heat. Dry toast the sourdough slices on both sides until golden brown and crisped. Remove them to a plate and immediately smear the butter onto one side. Set aside, tenting with foil to keep warm.
Wipe the bread crummies out of the skillet, then place it back on medium heat. Add the olive oil to the pan, then the garlic and scallions. When they begin to turn golden, increase the heat to medium-high and add the tomatoes and chipotle. Cook, stirring frequently, another 2 to 3 minutes.
Break the eggs into a bowl and beat gently with salt and black pepper to taste. Pour the eggs into the skillet and cook, stirring moderately, until they have reached your desired scrambled egg consistency. Runny eggs will only take 30 to 60 seconds, longer if you want them firmer.
As soon as the eggs are done, shut off the heat. Place the toasts on serving plates, spoon the eggs on top and sprinkle with cilantro. Serve immediately with the sour cream on the side or on top, if desired.