Tag Archives: Gingerbread

Classic Gingerbread

Classic Gingerbread

Yesterday I shared a once-a-year show-stopper of a holiday cake, and no lie – it takes some time and effort. Also, it kind of makes a mess. All worth it for an appropriate occasion, yes, but a mess nonetheless. Today’s cake is the complete opposite. This cake gets made in no time, uses a minimal amount of utensils and dishes, doesn’t need any frosting, and yet may be one of my favorite cakes I’ve eaten in a long time.

Classic Gingerbread

This is real gingerbread, yo. Old-school, classic, old-fashioned, straight-up gingerbread that offers no apologies for being what it is. Gingerbread is a very assertive cake with strong, in-your-face flavors and not a ton of sweetness. A lot of times, it gets watered down and all but changed in favor of a sweeter, lightly spiced cake calling itself gingerbread.

Classic Gingerbread

Not this version here. The spices are rightly heavy-handed, the molasses flavor is thick and musky as it should be, and the sweetness merely waves from the back row. I found it completely delicious and utterly satisfying. Perfect for a last-minute Christmas dessert. Enjoy!

Classic Gingerbread

Source: The Homesick Texan’s Family Table by Lisa Fain

Ingredients:
½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature
½ cup granulated sugar
1 large egg, beaten
1 cup molasses
2 ½ cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp ground cloves
1 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp ground cinnamon
¼ tsp ground nutmeg
½ tsp kosher salt
½ cup warm water
Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting the cake
Orange zest, for garnish

Directions:
Preheat your oven to 350 F. Lightly grease a 9-inch square baking dish.
Cream together the butter and sugar. Add the egg and molasses and beat until smooth and well combined. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, cloves, ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt. Add the dry ingredients to the wet and beat until just combined. Stir in the warm water until smooth. Pour the batter into the prepared baking dish.
Bake, uncovered, for 25 to 30 minutes, until a cake tester inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Be sure not to overcook it, as it will harden a bit as it cools.
While the cake is still warm, sift confectioners’ sugar over the top, as much or as little as you desire, then sprinkle evenly with the orange zest. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Gingerbread Doughnuts

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Let’s talk Christmas morning. Christmas morning brunch, to be more exact. It was always a big thing in my house growing up. My mom made sausage balls, every year without fail, and every year without fail, we would stuff our faces after tearing open our presents. And, as it turns out, at least where I’m from, Christmas brunch is a big deal indeed.

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Some families have their traditions, like we did, while others vary it up from year to year. If you fall into the first category, carry on strong, my friend. If you happen to fall into the second category though, then right about now you’re probably brainstorming ideas. And I’m here to give you one!

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Thanks to the wonder that is Pinterest, it’s impossible to not see enough Christmas morning brunch ideas to give you a seizure. And many of them look very delicious but also very time-consuming! Cinnamon rolls, monkey bread from scratch, homemade bagels… And that’s all well and good. It all sounds great, I don’t judge.

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However……. Raise your hand if, by the time December 25th actually arrives, you’re exhausted from the holiday season hoopla and all that it entails – the parties, the tree saga, the gift shopping, the gift wrapping, the church events, the kids’ activities, the family stuff. It goes on and on, and often, by the time Christmas morning actually rolls around, we’re a little bit over it, and the idea of getting up and making an involved, time-consuming brunch makes us think that maybe Scrooge was onto something.

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So I’m here to offer you one of the easiest, quickest, yet most delicious and perfect Christmas brunch ideas out there. Your family will love that you made them doughnuts, but they’re baked, so the oven does most of the work. It’s largely hands off for you. You don’t have to soften butter. You need no electric mixer, neither stand nor hand.

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Of course the gingerbread is perfectly seasonal, and this doughnut is deep flavor without being too spicy. The texture is so moist and light, with that wonderful glaze draped over the tops. They’ll be devoured in no time, you’ll have exerted minimal effort, and yet you’ll look like a rock star. Winning! I hope you and your family enjoy these!

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Source: ever so slightly adapted from Glazed, Filled, Sugared and Dipped by Stephen Collucci

{One Year Ago: Meat and Spinach Stuffed Shells}

Ingredients:
DOUGHNUTS:
1 cup all-purpose flour
¼ cup dark brown sugar
¾ tsp baking powder
¼ tsp baking soda
1 tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp ground ginger
¼ tsp ground nutmeg
1/8 tsp ground allspice
¼ tsp kosher salt
1 large egg
¼ cup sour cream
1 tbs honey
1 tbs molasses
2 tbs canola or vegetable oil
2 tbs whole milk

GLAZE:
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
¼ tsp ground cinnamon
¼ tsp ground ginger
2-3 tbs whole milk*

Directions:
Preheat your oven to 350 F. Grease a 6-count round doughnut pan. Set aside.
In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, brown sugar, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, allspice, and salt. In a small bowl, whisk to combine the egg, sour cream, honey, molasses, oil, and milk. Make a well in the dry ingredients and pour in the wet ingredients. Whisk until just combined.
Spoon the batter into either a pastry bag fitted with the round piping attachment, or simply into a quart-sized Ziplock baggie. If using the Ziplock, use kitchen shears to snip off one of the corners. Pipe the batter into the prepared doughnut pan, just about 2 tbs each, until they are just over half full. Be careful not to overfill.
Bake the doughnuts for 10 to 12 minutes, until a cake tester inserted into the center of one comes out clean.
While the doughnuts are baking, make the glaze. In a medium bowl, whisk together the sugar, cinnamon, ginger, and milk until well combined and you see no lumps. See the starred note below for how much milk to use.
When the doughnuts come out of the oven, let them cool slightly, then carefully pop them out onto a wire rack. While they are still warm, dip them one at a time into the glaze, then set them back on the wire rack. Put something underneath the rack, as the glaze will drip. You can spoon extra glaze on the doughnuts to get it all. Why would we waste glaze??

*This depends on how thick you want your glaze. If you want it thicker, like a cake glaze, use 2 tbs milk. If you want it thinner, which will make it resemble doughnut shop glazed doughnuts, use 3 tbs milk. I went with thinner, doughnut-shop-glazed doughnuts myself.

Gingerbread Dutch Baby

gingerbread dutch baby

Okay, I have a question for all the Dutch babies out there: where, I repeat, WHERE, have you been all my life??? These are the coolest, easiest, tastiest things EVER! You simply whip up a simple pancake-like batter – in the blender, no less! – and then you melt some butter in a cast-iron skillet. Once it’s melted, brush it up the sides, pour in the batter, and poof! You’re done with your part and the oven does the rest of the work.

Gingerbread Dutch Baby

Inside the oven, these babies puff, and wrinkle, and cave, and look so cool when you pull them out. The edges crisp but the inside stays moist. Texturally they are somewhere between a French crepe and an American pancake. Dutch babies are also known as German pancakes, and you’ve gotta wonder if this is just German efficiency at work here. Because they get whipped up in no time, way less time than it takes to make a batch of crepes or pancakes, and they taste just as good if not better than either! Oh, and perfect to serve to a brunch crowd.

Gingerbread Dutch baby

I wanted to make something gingerbread for the holiday season (it seems that December is the only acceptable month to make anything gingerbread-themed in Food Blog Land), and couldn’t decide between waffles, or cookies, or maybe a cake; and then I remembered this recipe for a gingerbread Dutch baby, and now here I am! This would make a perfect Christmas Day brunch if you’re so inclined. Enjoy!

Gingerbread Dutch baby, sliced

{One year ago: Pumpkin French Toast}

Source: The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook

Ingredients:
2 large eggs
1 tbs brown sugar
1 tsp unsulfured molasses
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
¼ tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp ground ginger
Pinch of ground cloves
1/8 tsp freshly grated or ground nutmeg
1/8 tsp salt
1/3 cup whole milk
2 tbs unsalted butter
Maple syrup, to serve

Directions:
Preheat your oven to 400 F. Crack the eggs into a blender and puree until they are smooth and pale yellow in color. Shut off the blender, then add the brown sugar, molasses, flour, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, nutmeg, salt, and whole milk. Process until smooth, stopping to scrape down the sides as needed. Set aside.
Melt the butter over high heat in a 9 or 10 inch cast-iron, or other oven-proof skillet. The original recipe calls for a 9 inch, the closest I had was a 10 inch cast iron, and it worked just fine. As the butter is melting, brush it up on the sides of the skillet thoroughly. Remove the pan from the heat, then pour the batter into the skillet. Immediately transfer the skillet to the oven and bake for 15 to 20 minutes. (Mine, in the larger 10 inch skillet, took only 15 minutes to bake).
Slide the Dutch baby onto a plate, or leave in the skillet; slice into wedges and serve with the maple syrup. You can also dust powdered sugar on the top; that’s how it is pictured in the SK cookbook, and it looks just scrumptious that way, but as someone who got a little hurried to snap pics because the scrambled eggs were getting cold, I can assure you that it’s just fine without.