Tag Archives: Nathalie Dupree

Shrimp and Andouille Cheddar Grits with Hot Pepper Cream Sauce #BrunchWeek

Welcome to the fourth annual #BrunchWeek hosted by Terri from Love and Confections and Christie from A Kitchen Hoor’s Adventures! Eight amazing sponsors are helping us host a GIVEAWAY of some incredible prizes for multiple winners. CLICK HERE to enter!

This is my first time participating in Brunch Week, so thank you for accepting me into the group! I’m thrilled to be here. We have some lovely sponsors for the week, including the one I’m highlighting today: Cabot Cheese.

Shrimp and Andouille Cheddar Grits with Hot Pepper Cream Sauce

But, and I say this with one hundred percent seriousness, I had already committed to the idea of sharing a version of shrimp and grits even before finding out about Cabot’s participation. I absolutely adore shrimp and grits, in pretty much any form. Except maybe the overcooked shrimp versions. Those we can all do without. Anywho…

Shrimp and Andouille Cheddar Grits with Hot Pepper Cream Sauce

There are about as many variations on shrimp and grits as there are fiends for the dish, and while I have zero complaints about a well-executed stripped down version, for Brunch Week I decided it had to be a bit more complex and special. This particular recipe features spicy Andouille sausage mingling with the shrimp which forms a bit of a saucy topping for the firmer-yet-luscious grits, and then it’s drizzled with an even spicier yet creamy actual sauce on top.

Shrimp and Andouille Cheddar Grits with Hot Pepper Cream Sauce

This was so delicious, so special and completely perfect to kick start Brunch Week. Stay tuned, there is much excitement to come! Enjoy!

Shrimp and Andouille Cheddar Grits with Hot Pepper Cream Sauce

Source: slightly adapted from Nathalie Dupree’s Shrimp and Grits by Nathalie Dupree

Ingredients:

CREAM SAUCE:
1/3 cup green vinegar-based hot sauce, such as green Tabasco
¼ cup dry white wine
1 shallot, chopped
1 tbs fresh lemon juice
1 tbs white wine vinegar
½ cup heavy cream
Salt and black pepper, to taste

SHRIMP:
Drizzle of olive oil, plus more as needed
8 oz. raw Andouille sausage, casings removed
1 red bell pepper, chopped
1 yellow bell pepper, chopped
½ cup minced onion, such as Vidalia
4 tsp chopped garlic
30 large raw shrimp, peeled and deveined
4 plum tomatoes, seeded and chopped
1 tsp Cajun seasoning
1 tsp Old Bay seasoning
Kosher salt and black pepper, to taste

GRITS:
5 cups water
3 cups whole milk
½ cup heavy cream
8 tbs unsalted butter
2 cups coarse grits, not instant
8 oz. sharp white Cabot cheddar cheese, shredded
Salt and black pepper, to taste

Directions:
Start with the CREAM SAUCE: combine the green hot sauce, wine, shallot, lemon juice, and vinegar in a medium-sized saucepan. Boil over medium heat until liquid is reduced to ½ cup, about 15 minutes. Stir in the heavy cream. Set aside.

Now make the SHRIMP: heat a drizzle of olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the sausage and crumble it with a wooden spoon or potato masher. Cook, stirring frequently, until no traces of pink remain. Add the peppers, onion, and garlic and saute until veggies are tender. Add the shrimp, tomatoes, Cajun seasoning, and Old Bay seasoning. Saute, stirring, until shrimp are pink and just cooked through. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Be aware of how much salt your Cajun and Old Bay seasonings may already have. Turn off the heat and set aside.

Now make the GRITS: bring the water, milk, cream and butter to a simmer in a medium-to-large stockpot. Gradually whisk in the grits. Stir frequently, until the grits are soft and thickened. This will take at least 15 minutes, and up to 1 hour depending on what brand of grits you are using. When the grits are ready, turn the heat to low and stir in the shredded cheese until it melts. Taste for seasoning and adjust with salt and pepper as necessary.

To serve, rewarm the cream sauce and shrimp. Spoon the grits into bowls and top with the shrimp and andouille sauce. Now top with the hot pepper cream sauce and serve immediately.

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Check out my fellow #BrunchWeek bloggers! Some very tasty recipes here!

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Disclaimer: Thank you to #BrunchWeek Sponsors: Red Star Yeast, Dixie Crystals, Cabot Cheese, Vidalia Onion Committee, Sage Fruits, Nielsen-Massey, KitchenIQ, and Le Creuset for providing the prizes free of charge. These companies also provided the bloggers with samples and product to use for #BrunchWeek. All opinions are my own.

Banana Cream Pie

Banana Cream Pie

I’m thrilled to announce that I’m an aunt again (!!!) – a good two weeks earlier than expected. My sister surprised us all with the early arrival of a beautiful baby boy, my newest nephew Preston!! He spent a little time in the NICU but is doing quite well now. He joins big sisters Hannah and Claire, plus big brother Jack, who does not have a birth entry here because I did not have this blog when Jack was born. Oh the problems of being the first born. If it’s any consolation, I have way more baby pictures of you, Jack. 😉

Banana Cream Pie

I’ve had this incredible banana cream pie in the to-blog queue for a few weeks now, and seeing as this is one of my absolute favorite pies on planet Earth, I have been looking for the right occasion to share it. If getting a new nephew isn’t such an occasion, then what possibly could be?

Banana Cream Pie

This is a classic, from-scratch version that is one of the best I’ve tasted, ever (and trust me, I’ve done the leg work there – all the members of my family are big fans of this pie and its pudding cousin). It’s perfect, and creamy, and everything you want banana cream pie to be (and then some!). Even though it wasn’t necessarily planned this way, I really can’t think of a better dessert to share in honor of baby Preston’s arrival.

Banana Cream Pie

I can’t wait to meet him and watch him grow up!! And seeing as he’s one of us, I’m sure that in a few short years he too will be a big fiend for anything containing banana pudding. Enjoy!

Banana Cream Pie

Source: slightly adapted from Mastering the Art of Southern Cooking by Nathalie Dupree

Ingredients:

CRUST:
2 cups graham cracker crumbs
2 tsp granulated sugar
½ cup melted unsalted butter

FILLING:
2 medium bananas, cut into ½ inch slices
¾ cup granulated sugar
5 tbs cornstarch
¼ tsp salt
3 cups whole milk
4 egg yolks
¼ cup unsalted butter
2 tsp vanilla extract
1 cup heavy cream
1-2 tbs powdered sugar

Directions:
For the CRUST: preheat your oven to 350 F. Stir together the graham cracker crumbs, sugar, and melted butter. Grease a regular 9” pie plate and press the crumbs onto the bottom and up the sides of the plate. Bake 15 minutes. Let cool.
For the FILLING, arrange the bananas in the crust. Whisk the sugar, cornstarch, and salt together in a medium saucepan. Stir together until there are no lumps. Mix together the milk and egg yolks and stir into the sugar-cornstarch mixture. Whisk until smooth. Move the pan over medium heat and stir constantly until the custard comes to a boil, taking care to scrape the bottom and sides of the pan. Reduce the heat to simmer and cook, stirring, until thick, about 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and beat in the butter and vanilla. Pour the custard over the bananas. Cool 20 minutes at room temperature, covered with plastic wrap to prevent a skin from forming.
Meanwhile, beat the heavy cream until soft peaks form. Add the powdered sugar to taste and beat until stiff peaks form. Spread the whipped cream evenly over the cooled custard and refrigerate to let it set up, preferably overnight but at least several hours. Overnight yields the best results.

Cat Head Biscuits

Cat Head Biscuits

Everyone loves a food with a funny name, though this one may border on slightly disturbing. If one is completely unaware of what the name does signify, it’s entirely plausible to gravitate toward thinking about a biscuit quite literally made out of a cat’s head. Rest assured, this is never the case. We do not eat housecats in America, thank goodness.

Cat Head Biscuits

No, cat head biscuits are so named because they are larger-than-usual biscuits that are “the size of a cat’s head.” Also, they are typically a bit rougher on their tops, and thus someone long, long ago remarked that it looked like the top of an orange tabby cat’s head. The name stuck and here we are today.

These biscuits really are huge. I tried to demonstrate with photographic evidence that they are indeed the size of a cat’s head. Alas, Watson would NOT cooperate with posing for a picture, and this is the best I could do.

Cat Head Biscuits (plus a cat!)

Despite Watson’s insubordination, they are everything you would want a giant biscuit to be: flaky, so buttery, tons of beautiful biscuit flavor. Perfect for hogging or sharing! I hope y’all enjoy them!

Cat Head Biscuits

{One Year Ago: Potato Waffles with Bacon and Chives; Genoa Salami and Kalamata Olive Calzones}
{Two Years Ago: Homemade Blackening Seasoning}

Source: slightly adapted from Southern Biscuits by Nathalie Dupree

Ingredients:
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 cups cake flour
2 tbs baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
1 ½ tbs granulated sugar
1 tsp kosher salt
¼ cup well-chilled unsalted butter, roughly cut into ¼-inch pieces
¼ cup well-chilled unsalted butter, roughly cut into ½-inch pieces
1 ½ cups well-shaken cold buttermilk
¼ cup melted butter

Directions:
reheat your oven to 400 F.
In a large, wide bowl, gently whisk together the flours, baking powder, baking soda, sugar, and salt. Scatter the ¼-inch pieces of butter over the flour mixture, then use your fingers, two knives, or a pastry blender to work the fat into the flour until it looks like well-crumbled feta cheese. Now scatter the ½-inch pieces of butter over the fat and repeat the process. If this process took longer than 5 minutes, place the bowl in the refrigerator for 5 minutes to chill.
Now make a well in the center of the flour-butter mixture and pour in the buttermilk. Stir with a rubber spatula, using broad, circular strokes to quickly pull the flour into the buttermilk. Mix just until the dry ingredients are moistened and the sticky dough begins to pull away from the sides of the bowl. You can add up to ¼ cup more all-purpose flour or up to ¼ cup extra buttermilk if the mixture is too wet or too dry, respectively.
Lightly sprinkle a large cutting board with some all-purpose flour. Turn the dough out onto the board and sprinkle the top lightly with flour. With floured hands, fold the dough in half and pat out into a ¾-to-1-inch round. Dip a 4-inch biscuit cutter in flour, then stamp out biscuits. Be sure you stamp in an up-and-down motion and do not twist your wrist. This makes the biscuits tougher.
Brush a light layer of the melted butter in a 12-inch cast-iron skillet. Transfer the biscuits to the skillet as you stamp them out. Reroll the scraps and stamp out more biscuits until you use up your dough. I got 9 biscuits. Place them all in the skillet, as close together as possible. Pour the remaining melted butter over all the biscuits, then bake for 20-25 minutes, until the tops are golden brown.
Remove from the oven, let the biscuits cool slightly, then serve hot.

Breaded Tomato Casserole

Breaded Tomato Casserole

As y’all know, Matt and I met, over twelve years ago, on Bourbon Street in New Orleans, so every two to three years, we take a little weekend weekend getaway to New Orleans, sometime in February or March, and two weeks ago, that weekend rolled around for us again.

Breaded Tomato Casserole

I have a favorite kitchen supply store that I must frequent every time we’re there, right on Royal Street, and it never fails that I always pick up a cookbook or two when I’m there (despite the fact that I always say I won’t this trip). One of my finds this time around was Southern Biscuits by Nathalie Dupree.

breaded tomato casserole

I’m quite an admirer of Dupree’s, so please know my tail is a bit between my legs when I tell you that I had no idea such a book of hers even existed. But, better late than never, I always say. It excited me to no end to find a book entirely dedicated to biscuits, one of my great loves in life.

breaded tomato casserole

I immediately baked up a batch upon returning home, and of course they were wonderful; but I think the section of the book that might intrigue me most of all is the chapter on using up your leftover, day-old biscuits. I knew I wanted to dive into this chapter most of all, so I made us this odd-sounding yet compelling dish, which really couldn’t be simpler. It’s just stale biscuits crumbled up and mixed with a touch of sugar, canned tomatoes, and I threw in some dried oregano. I added some grated parmesan to the top, for a bit of crust, and I must say that we just loved it.

Breaded Tomato Casserole

Tasting both distinctly Italian and US Southern, it’s reminiscent of bread pudding, but denser, and the tomato flavor is incredibly prominent. And of course, for that reason, make sure you use very high quality canned tomatoes – they’re not hiding behind anything here! While this dish is hearty, Matt and I both firmly agreed it’s a side dish, and would have a little trouble passing off as a main dish – it’s just not quite filling enough.

Breaded Tomato Casserole

As an aside, or a post-script, I used canned tomatoes here because 1) the original recipe is written that way and it sounded good to me, and 2) fresh tomatoes are decidedly not the least bit in season in the northeastern US. But, I’m thinking this could be incredible revisited in the summer using fresh juicy tomatoes in their peak season. Hmm… Enjoy!

Breaded Tomato Casserole

{One Year Ago: White and Dark Chocolate Bread Pudding with NOLA Bourbon Sauce}
{Two Years Ago: Red Beans and Rice; Irish Soda Bread}

Source: slightly adapted from Southern Biscuits by Nathalie Dupree

Ingredients:
3 cups torn or chopped biscuits in ½-inch pieces
1 tsp granulated sugar
Pinch of kosher salt
A generous ½ tsp dried oregano
1 (14-oz.) can diced tomatoes, undrained
½ cup unsalted butter, melted
Grated parmesan cheese, for the top of the casserole (a couple generous handfuls)

Directions:
Preheat your oven to 350 F. Grease a 2 ½ quart baking dish and set aside.
In a large bowl, toss together the biscuit pieces, sugar, salt, and oregano. Add the tomatoes and stir to combine thoroughly and coat all the biscuit pieces with the juices. Transfer the mixture to the prepared baking dish and pour the melted butter evenly over the top. Bake 25-30 minutes, then evenly sprinkle the top with parmesan. Put it back in the oven for 5 minutes, then remove and serve warm.