Tag Archives: Prune

Creole Shrimp Omelet with Tabasco Slurry

Creole Shrimp Omelet with Tabasco Slurry

I’m guessing you read the title of this recipe post and thought some of the same things Matt and I said aloud as we were eating this meal. Things like whaaaattttt???? And maybe, insane! Deranged, perhaps. And, this doesn’t make any sense whatsoever.

Creole Shrimp Omelet with Tabasco Slurry

It’s all true. Equally true though, is how unbelievably delicious this breakfast (or breakfast-for-dinner if you wish) is. I made it out of sheer morbid curiosity – like, what the hell is Tabasco slurry and how does that work?? – but this ended up being surprisingly addictive and caused much swooning, in between wiping sweat off the brow.

Though it is quite hot and spicy, not for the faint of heart, I will highly recommend this to all y’all Cajun food lovers and chile-heads. The shrimp itself isn’t terribly spicy, but assertive and perfectly plump, folded into a lacy-edged, thin yet rich omelet, and then that Tabasco slurry really makes the whole thing.

Creole Shrimp Omelet with Tabasco Slurry

It’s very sweet yet very hot, and it serves to balance out the dish yet simultaneously add an enormous punch. Even though it made my eyes water, I seriously couldn’t get enough. This recipe definitely falls into the category of Just Crazy Enough to Work, and if you like things spicy, then I can’t recommend it highly enough.

Creole Shrimp Omelet with Tabasco Slurry

Source: adapted from Prune by Gabrielle Hamilton

Ingredients:
12 large to jumbo shrimp, about ½ lb, peeled and deveined, including taking the tails off
1 tbs Creole seasoning
Kosher salt and black pepper, to taste
3 tbs unsalted butter, divided
4 large eggs, divided
2 tbs heavy cream, divided
½ cup confectioners’ sugar
2 tbs Tabasco

Directions:
Place the shrimp in a medium to large mixing bowl, then add the Creole seasoning plus kosher salt and pepper. Toss to coat well.
In a medium nonstick skillet, heat 1 tbs butter over medium-high heat. When it melts, add the shrimp and cook, stirring frequently, until opaque and cooked through. Remove to a plate. Shut off the heat and wipe out the skillet.
Beat 2 eggs in a small bowl with 1 tbs heavy cream, plus salt and pepper to taste. Add 1 tbs butter to the same skillet and place over medium-low to medium heat (somewhere in between is ideal). When the butter melts, pour in the eggs. Use a rubber spatula to lightly and gently stir the top of the eggs – don’t scrape the sides or bottom of the skillet. Once the sides have set, use the spatula to gently lift them up and let the runny egg in the middle run under the firmer sides. Just before the last bit of the top of the eggs have set, place 3 shrimp on one half of the eggs. Carefully flip the other half over the shrimp. Let sit a few seconds, then transfer to a plate. Repeat with the remaining 2 eggs, 1 tbs heavy cream, and 1 tbs butter.
To make the slurry, briskly whisk the sugar and the Tabasco sauce until smooth.
To serve, place 1 omelet on a serving plate, then top with 3 more shrimp. Drizzle half of the Tabasco slurry over top. Repeat with the other omelet and serve immediately.

Muffulletta Salad

Muffulletta Salad

And a happy blizzard to you too! Yeesh. How many of y’all will be affected by this snowstorm? My area is supposedly getting over two feet of snow, and pretty much *everything* is cancelled tomorrow. Please, please stay safe and warm!! And will you be doing lots of cooking and/or baking during the storm? I’m sure I will!

Muffulletta Salad

But, since it’s snowing outside, let’s talk salads. HA! I’ve decided that this will be a themed week, one I’ve really had fun with – I’m turning classic dishes into salads! The first is the Muffulletta sandwich. It’s a New Orleans classic, made of deli meats, sliced cheese, and an olive salad packed in between a special bread loaf. I have yet to meet anyone who dislikes them. Every visit I make to New Orleans, I simply cannot leave until I’ve had a muffulletta.

Muffulletta Salad

And today, we shall turn the iconic sandwich into a salad! One of my lovely Christmas presents, from my sis and her family (thank you all!!!), was Chef Gabrielle Hamilton’s highly-anticipated cookbook, Prune – and that’s where I found this recipe. Tasting exactly as advertised, this salad was hearty, satisfying, salty, briny, crunchy, and of course, oh so tasty.

Muffulletta Salad

Highly recommend the book. And that you make this salad! Stay tuned, because every day this week we are turning classic dishes into salads!! Enjoy!

Muffulletta Salad

{One Year Ago: Blackberry Jam Toaster Pastries, Frijoles Borrachos, Meyer Lemon Pudding Pops}
{Two Years Ago: Maple Glazed Baby Back Ribs, Blood Orange Margaritas}

Source: adapted from Prune by Gabrielle Hamilton

Ingredients:
1 tsp dried oregano
½ tsp crushed red chile flakes
Heavy grind of black pepper
Light sprinkle of kosher salt
1/3-1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
3 tbs green olive brine
Splash of liquid from the jar of piquillo peppers
Splash of white wine vinegar
2 cloves garlic, peeled
1 small red onion, sliced
1 large romaine heart, chopped
2 celery ribs, sliced, with their leaves
1 (10 oz.) frozen artichoke hearts, thawed and drained
4-6 oz. deli-sliced ham (make sure you get a good quality ham here – so many of them are processed with tons of extra sugar and sodium), sliced
4-6 oz. deli-sliced soppressata, sliced
4 oz. deli-sliced mortadella, sliced
4 oz. deli-sliced provolone cheese, sliced
3-4 oz. roasted piquillo peppers, sliced
2 oz. pimento stuffed green olives, sliced
2 oz. Kalamata olives, pitted and sliced

Directions:
First make the dressing: in a medium bowl, combine the oregano, crushed chile flakes, black pepper, kosher salt, olive oil, green olive brine, piquillo pepper liquid, and vinegar. Grate the garlic cloves into the dressing using a microplane. Add the sliced onion, stir to coat, and set the bowl aside while you prep the rest of the salad.
In a large salad bowl, add the romaine, celery, artichoke hearts, ham, soppressata, mortadella, provolone, piquillo peppers, green olives, and Kalamata olives. Lift the sliced red onion out of the dressing with a slotted spoon and add to the salad. Season with a pinch of salt. Gently toss with your hands, combing through with your fingers; integrate all the ingredients so it doesn’t look clumpy and jumbled. Drizzle the dressing over the salad and gently toss to dress. Add the dressing judiciously, a little at a time to ensure you do not overdress your salad. You can always add more, but you can’t take any out. Serve immediately.