Tag Archives: Spring

Asparagus, Goat Cheese, and Rhubarb Salad #SundaySupper

Asparagus, Goat Cheese and Rhubarb Salad

Welcome to Sunday Supper, where our theme is Welcome Spring!! This weekend is the first real, authentic, pleasant spring weather I’ve personally had, so I’ve spent most of my time outside by the Hoboken waterfront instead of writing up this post. Oops. I regret nothing.

Asparagus, Goat Cheese and Rhubarb Salad

If we’re talking spring in the culinary realm, which of course we are, nothing says spring more to me than two produce items: rhubarb, and asparagus. So combining them both in a light salad simply could not be more perfect for today’s theme. This salad is light yet filling, and incredibly delicious. The flavors marry perfectly, the texture is ideally contrasted to come together in one amazing bite – though you’ll take many more bites than one, trust me on that.

Asparagus, Goat Cheese and Rhubarb Salad

In short, I loved this. And now I’m going back outside before we get days upon days of April rains again. Enjoy! And be sure you check out the Spring recipes from my Sunday Supper crew!

Asparagus, Goat Cheese and Rhubarb Salad

Source: Girl in the Kitchen by Stephanie Izard

Ingredients:
1 cup white balsamic vinegar
½ cup granulated sugar
1 lb. rhubarb, sliced
¼ cup olive oil plus 2 tbs
2 lbs. fresh asparagus
Kosher salt and black pepper
4 cups baby arugula
2 oz. crumbled goat cheese
¾ cup slivered almonds, toasted

Directions:
Combine the vinegar and sugar in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally, until the sugar is dissolved. Pour the hot liquid over the rhubarb in a medium bowl and let sit until the liquid has cooled and the rhubarb is slightly tender.
Strain the liquid from the rhubarb, reserving both. Make a vinaigrette by whisking 2 tbs of the rhubarb liquid with ¼ cup olive oil in a small bowl. Discard the remaining liquid or keep in the refrigerator for another use.
Preheat your grill or indoor grill pan to medium-high. Trim the asparagus spears and toss with the remaining 2 tbs olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
Grill the asparagus until tender, 5 to 7 minutes, turning once or twice. Let the asparagus cool slightly, then chop into 2-inch pieces.
In a large salad bowl, combine the asparagus pieces with the arugula, goat cheese, almonds and reserved rhubarb. Drizzle in the vinaigrette, toss to coat, and serve immediately.

Breakfast:

Appetizers:

Beverages:

Main Dish:

Side Dish:

Dessert:

Plus Spring Vegetable Minestrone and more Spring Recipes from Sunday Supper Movement

Sunday Supper MovementJoin the #SundaySupper conversation on twitter on Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. To get more great Sunday Supper Recipes, visit our website or check out our Pinterest board.

Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement

Pistachio Crumble Topped Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Pistachio Crumble Topped Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

My apologies – I haven’t been posting as much recently – time-consuming changes are afoot in my house, specifically meaning a move across town (and technically to a different state, but state lines are quite blurry in the NYC area, so moving to a different state won’t really count until the inevitable day I’m held hostage at the DMV changing my driver’s license). We’ll move in two weeks, and we’ve found our new apartment, signed all the pertinent papers, and now are just trying to schedule out the movers and all the pesky little details that accompany any move. Our new place is about the same size as our current one, square footage wise, but a completely different layout. So some swapping of furniture is in order, plus rethinking some of the wall décor.

Pistachio Crumble Topped Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

I hope to be a better blogger for the summer than I have been this spring. I’m a bit disappointed to have only gotten in one rhubarb recipe before its season begins to wane, but this pie is so much better than nothing, and I’m very happy the one recipe I made was such a beauty.

pistachio crumble topped strawberry rhubarb pie

When it comes to fruit pies, I tend to not play favorites between crumble toppings and top crusts – both please my palate. But I was very intrigued to find a recipe that included pistachios in said crumble. If I’m ever forced to pick a favorite nut, it’ll be a toss-up between pecans and pistachios, so this recipe was right up my alley. And I thought the pistachios played very well with the flavor of the strawberries in particular.

Pistachio Crumble Topped Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

All in all, just a superb pie. The flavor combination of strawberries and rhubarb is a classic for good reason, and here they are nestled in a flaky crust (though feel free to sub in your own recipe if you have a favorite) and then topped with a crunchy crumble laced with pistachios that popped against the fruit’s sweetness. The thickness of the filling was perfect, as it held together and didn’t run all over the place (such a fruit pie pet peeve of mine!). I hope you enjoy it!

Pistachio Crumble Topped Strawberry Rhubarb Pie

Source: The Boozy Baker by Lucy Baker

Ingredients:

CRUST:
1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
1 tbs granulated sugar
¼ tsp salt
1 stick (8 tbs) unsalted butter, well chilled and cut into ½-inch cubes
1 tbs vodka
4-8 tbs ice water

FILLING:
1 ¼ lbs. fresh rhubarb, trimmed and chopped
1 cup granulated sugar
½ tsp ground cinnamon
½ cup strawberry liqueur, or a fruity port wine
¼ cup cornstarch
½ cup strawberries, hulled and sliced

CRUMBLE TOPPING:
½ cup all-purpose flour
2/3 cup rolled oats
¼ cup granulated sugar
¼ cup packed brown sugar
¼ tsp ground cinnamon
¼ tsp salt
¾ cup chopped unsalted pistachios
7 tbs unsalted butter, diced

Directions:
For the CRUST: combine the flour, sugar, and salt in a large bowl. Add the butter and use a pastry blender or two forks to work the fat into the flour mixture. The butter should be the size of peas. Sprinkle the vodka over the flour mixture, then sprinkle 4 tbs water over. Using a rubber spatula, work the liquid into the flour mixture, adding more water 1 tbs at a time as needed to get the dough to just come together. Use your hands to work the dough into a ball, getting the last little scraggles of flour in the bottom of the bowl, and then flatten it into a disc. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 30 minutes.
On a floured surface, roll the dough into a 12-inch circle. Transfer to a 9-inch regular pie plate and fold the edges under, then crimp the edges decoratively with your fingers or a fork. Put in the refrigerator while preparing the filling.
For the FILLING: combine the rhubarb, sugar, and cinnamon in a medium sauce pot. Cook over medium heat until the rhubarb begins to soften and the sugar dissolves, about 5 minutes.
Meanwhile, combine the strawberry liqueur and cornstarch and stir until smooth. Add it to the rhubarb mixture and bring to a boil, stirring constantly until thickened, no more than 5 minutes (this took me about 2 minutes – watch it carefully). Remove from the heat, transfer to the refrigerator and let it cool and chill for about 30 minutes.
For the CRUMBLE TOPPING: combine the flour, oats, sugar, brown sugar, cinnamon, salt, and pistachios in a medium bowl. Cut in the butter using either your pastry blender or two forks until it forms coarse crumbs. Set aside.
Preheat your oven to 375 F. Remove the crust and the rhubarb mixture from the refrigerator. Stir the strawberries into the rhubarb mixture, then pour into the pie crust. Sprinkle with the crumb topping (you likely won’t need all of it), then place the pie plate onto a baking sheet. Place the baking sheet in the oven and bake for 30-35 minutes, or until the crust is crisp and golden and the filling is bubbling. Let cool for a bit, then slice into wedges and serve. Keep in the refrigerator topped with aluminum foil.

Veal Stew with Spring Greens #SundaySupper

Veal Stew with Spring Greens

Welcome to another Sunday Supper! Our theme this week is Spring Fling because… it’s about time, isn’t it? Most of us, it seems, had another pretty rough winter and it’s high time the snow and freezing temperatures let us be.

Probably obvious, but of course we over at Sunday Supper are ushering in this most welcome new season with spring recipes. I chose to feature this stew, which uses veal – very reminiscent of spring – and then highlights many of the greens just now coming into season.

Veal Stew with Spring Greens

Like spinach, and watercress, and leeks, and yes – romaine. Yep, I’m going to go there and ask you to put romaine lettuce in your stew. It’s weird. And yet – it works. The romaine doesn’t wilt the way you fear it will, instead it leaves a lovely crunch, yet wilts just enough to blend in with the texture of the stew.

veal stew with spring greens

The veal becomes impossibly moist and tender, and as a bonus, it takes a much shorter time to cook than would beef. The flavors here are delicate but not precious. It’s light but still hearty.

Veal Stew with Spring Greens

So happy Spring to everyone! Summer is around the corner! Enjoy this one last stew of the colder months. And be sure you check out my Sunday Supper gang, they’ve brought some beautiful recipes for Spring!

Veal Stew with Spring Greens

{Two Years Ago: Tomato Cornbread}

Source: slightly adapted from Food & Wine Magazine, April 2010

Ingredients:
3 tbs unsalted butter, divided
1 tbs olive oil, divided
3 lbs. veal stew meat, trimmed if necessary, and blotted dry with paper towels
Kosher salt and black pepper
1 cup dry white wine
1 large bunch of adult spinach leaves, chopped
1 large bunch of sorrel leaves, chopped
1 head of romaine, chopped
1 bunch of watercress, chopped
1 leek, white part only, sliced in half lengthwise and cut into half moons
¼ cup finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
¼ cup finely chopped fresh tarragon
¼ cup finely chopped fresh chives
1 cup crème fraiche
Hunks of baguette, for serving

Directions:
Preheat your oven to 325 F. Set a large Dutch oven over medium-high to high heat. Melt a pat or two of the butter, plus a drizzle of olive oil, in the hot pot. Add the veal and cook until browned, turning once. Do not crowd the pan. You will probably need to do this in batches, so use a little of the butter and oil for each batch. When the last batch has been browned, add all the browned veal, plus any accumulated juices back into the pot. Add the wine, then remove from the heat. Cover the Dutch oven with a piece of parchment paper, then cover with the pot’s lid. Transfer to the oven for 1 hour.
Now add the spinach, sorrel, romaine, watercress, leek, parsley, tarragon, chives and crème fraiche to the pot. Stir well, then season to taste with salt and pepper. Cover again with the parchment and the lid and return to the oven for 30 minutes longer, until the greens are wilted and the veal is tender.
Ladle the stew into bowls and serve with the bread alongside for mopping.
Note: if the greens are initially overwhelming your Dutch oven and threatening to spill over, then add about half of them without the crème fraiche, re-cover the pot with the parchment and lid and cook about 15 minutes, then add the remaining greens plus crème fraiche, stir, and cook another 15 minutes.

Beverages

Appetizers

Sides

Entreés

Desserts

Sunday Supper MovementJoin the #SundaySupper conversation on twitter on Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. To get more great Sunday Supper Recipes, visit our website or check out our Pinterest board.

Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement.

Strawberry Rhubarb Sorbet

Strawberry rhubarb sorbet 029

In what I would presume to be very old news by now in foodie-land, celebrity chef Bobby Flay has opened his first new fine dining restaurant in years: Gato. I’ve followed his career for years now, so of course Matt and I snagged reservations as soon as we could after Gato first opened last month. We figured it would be a luxurious, romantic date-night-out-on-the-town kind of dinner. And if you can experience that sort of thing at 6:30 pm on a Tuesday, well, then that’s what it was!

making strawberry rhubarb sorbet 001

making Strawberry Rhubarb sorbet 004

In all seriousness, the meal was insanely delicious. Service was fantastic, the décor is beautiful, and the whole night was capped off with a celebrity sighting (Tommy Hilfiger) and dessert: for me, blackberry crostata with strawberry rhubarb gelato. Oh my. Simply *divine* (the dessert, not Tommy Hilfiger. I’m more of a Ralph Lauren girl myself). Anywho….

strawberry rhubarb sorbet 012

I adored that gelato, and wanted to recreate it at home ASAP. But then I remembered that swimsuit season is rapidly descending upon us, and sorbet sounded better to my waistline. So Strawberry Rhubarb Sorbet it was! This little frozen treat is really wonderful, and so easy to pull off. The fruit really shines, and of course the color is stunning. This disappeared quite quickly in my house – I found we didn’t miss the cream of that gelato at all. Enjoy!

Strawberry Rhubarb Sorbet 039

{One Year Ago: Fried Green Tomatoes, Rhubarb Ginger Soda, Rhubarb Jam Tart}

Source: The Perfect Scoop by David Lebovitz

Ingredients:
12 oz. fresh rhubarb
2/3 cup water
¾ cup granulated sugar
10 oz. fresh strawberries, rinsed and hulled
½ tsp fresh lemon juice

Directions:
Wipe down the rhubarb stalks and trim the ends off. Chop or slice the rhubarb into ½-inch pieces.
Place the rhubarb, water, and sugar in a medium stockpot. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 3-5 minutes, until the rhubarb is tender and cooked through. Remove from the heat and let it cool to room temperature.
Slice the strawberries and place them in your blender. Add the cooled rhubarb mixture and puree until very smooth. Chill in the refrigerator until thoroughly cold. Then churn in your ice cream maker according to manufacturer’s instructions.

Rhubarb Upside-Down Cake

Rhubarb Upside Down Cake 050

It’s official: rhubarb is here! Judging by the fact that my Whole Foods was nearly out today, and that the most popular page on my blog the past couple weeks (by far!) is Rhubarb Scones, I’d have to surmise that everyone is scrambling to get themselves some of the beautiful tart produce.

rhubarb upside down cake 051

Rhubarb Upside Down Cake 055

Fortunately I got my hands on some gorgeous rhubarb during last week and made this wonderful, humble little cake with my stash. I have a thing for upside down cakes. Their texture is thick and moist, and I always love baking with fruit.

rhubarb upside down cake 072

But I also have a little theory that anyone who seeks out to make an upside-down cake is really at heart an adrenaline junkie. Because they are always a risk, right? There’s always that chance the cake won’t flip properly. You always hold your breath a little and your heart rate speeds up just a bit as you make that flip. And then there’s the rush of reward when it works.

Rhubarb Upside Down cake 077

Well, anyone who knows me well can attest to my lack of risk-averseness and love of thrilling stuff like roller coasters. So maybe there’s a connection, who knows. No matter your feelings about sky diving and the like, you should give this cake a go while rhubarb is still in season. Enjoy!

rhubarb upside down cake 080

{One Year Ago: Linguine with White Clam Sauce, Lettuce, Bacon and Cherry Tomato Salad with Aioli Dressing}

Source: The Providence and Rhode Island Cookbook by Linda Beaulieu

Ingredients:
3 cups sliced rhubarb (about 1 lb.)
1 cup granulated sugar, divided
1/3 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 ½ tsp baking powder
1 large egg
1 tsp vanilla extract
½ cup whole milk
1 ¼ cups all-purpose flour

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 350 F. Grease a 9” round cake pan. Set aside.
In a medium to large stockpot, combine the rhubarb and 2/3 cup of the sugar. Cook over medium-low heat, stirring frequently, until the sugar melts, but not until it caramelizes. Pour this mixture into your prepared cake pan and use a spatula to spread the rhubarb out into an even layer.
In a mixing bowl, beat the butter and remaining 1/3 cup of sugar and baking powder until fluffy. Beat in the egg and vanilla. Gradually add the milk, alternating with the flour, beating in between each addition. Spoon the batter evenly over the rhubarb layer.
Bake about 30 to 35 minutes, until a cake tester inserted into the center comes out clean, and it is lightly browned at the edges.
Cool in the pan for 5 minutes. Then run a knife around the edges. Place a plate upside down on the cake pan. Carefully and quickly flip it over 180 degrees and wait for a second. You should feel the weight shift. Then carefully remove the cake pan and the cake should be sitting pretty on the plate. Let cool, then slice into wedges and serve.

Roast Leg of Lamb with Parsley Walnut Pesto #SundaySupper

Roast Leg of Lamb with Parsley Walnut Pesto 005

Happy Easter!! Today our Sunday Supper theme is Passover and/or Easter dishes – very apropos, don’t you think? It really got me thinking about how we celebrated Easter growing up, particularly the edible part.

roast leg of lamb w/ parsley walnut pesto 024

Where I’m from, you can always count on two dishes making an appearance on every Easter table: deviled eggs, and glazed ham. While I have come quite far in expanding my palate and recovering from picky eating, I’m still only human. I don’t like everything out there. Thanksgiving stuffing, for one. You know what else I can’t stand?

Glazed ham.
And deviled eggs.
Those are seriously two of my least favorite things in the world.

Clearly, Easter is not my holiday.

Roast leg of lamb with parsley walnut pesto 001

Until moving to New York, that is. Easter is a bit different up here. There are still deviled eggs, it seems I’ll never escape those completely, and yes, some people do a ham, but I’ve pleasantly discovered that lamb is a very popular Easter dish here. Seeing as I adore lamb in any cut or preparation, I think it’s safe to say, I’ve found my people.

Easter roast leg of lamb 026

Of course I bring you a roast leg of lamb today. This was rich, flavorful, meaty, and beautifully textured. It was also a tad underdone when I first sliced into it, thanks to my meat thermometer hitting the skids at a very inopportune moment. I ended up having to cook this beautiful meat without a clue of its internal temperature at any given time. So we kind of had some lamb tartare. While not my intention, I wasn’t too upset as I like lamb tartare. But if you don’t, then I highly recommend a working meat thermometer. And yes, that is why my pictures are rather limited. I didn’t want to show you the rare part that was, let’s face it, still bleating a little.

But, I would highly urge you to look past all the hiccups my malfunctioning meat thermometer decided to cause and give this one a go. It’s really amazing. And can we say leftover sandwiches??? Wheeeee!!!!

Roast leg of lamb w/ parsley walnut pesto 031

{One Year Ago: Roasted Asparagus with Bacon Vinaigrette, Jalapeno Popper Grilled Cheese Sandwiches}

Source: Keys to the Kitchen by Aida Mollenkamp

Ingredients:
½ cup fresh flat-leaf Italian parsley
¼ cup fresh marjoram leaves
4 tsp kosher salt, plus more for the lamb
8 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper, plus more for the lamb
1 tbs balsamic vinegar
1 tbs honey
3-6 tbs olive oil, plus more for the lamb
¾ cup toasted walnuts
1 (5-6 lb.) boneless leg of lamb, butterflied (get the butcher to do this for you)

Directions:
Make the pesto: in the bowl of a food processor, combine the parsley, marjoram, salt, garlic cloves, pepper, vinegar, honey, and olive oil. Pulse until smooth. Add the walnuts and process again until smooth, adding more olive oil if need be, but not too much. You want this to be a very thick pesto.
Unroll the lamb all the way. Rub the meat with olive oil, then season with salt and black pepper. Spoon half the pesto into the center of the flattened lamb and use a spoon to smooth it out, leaving about a 1-inch border. Roll the meat back up and tie it in several pieces with kitchen string.
Rub additional olive oil, salt and pepper on the outside of the lamb. Place the lamb on a rack in a roasting pan. Let it sit at room temperature for 20-30 minutes while you preheat your oven.
Speaking of which, preheat your oven to 450 F. Roast the lamb until golden brown, about 20 minutes. Lower the oven temperature to 375 F and roast until an instant read meat thermometer registers 125 F for medium-rare, about 135-140 F for medium. I highly recommend you do not go beyond medium. For medium-rare, this will take anywhere from 40 to 60 minutes. Seriously, use a functioning meat thermometer.
When the lamb is done, let it rest 10 to 15 minutes before carving. While it is resting, spoon the remaining pesto into the roasting pan and stir to combine with the meat drippings. Scoop up the pesto drippings and transfer to a gravy boat or small bowl.
To carve and serve the lamb, cut away the kitchen strings, and throw them deep into the trash if you have pets. Using a sharp knife, cut the meat against the grain into slices. Serve with the pesto pan drippings spooned over the lamb.

And don’t forget to check out the rest of the fabulous Sunday Supper team!

Breakfast/Brunch

Appetizers:

Savory and Sweet Breads:

Sides and Salads:

Main Dishes:

Desserts:

Join the #SundaySupper conversation on twitter on Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. Check out our #SundaySupper Pinterest board for more fabulous recipes and food photos.

Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement.

Carrot Cake Pancakes

Carrot Cake Pancakes

Happy Friday!! We are wrapping up Carrot Week on an extremely delicious, breakfast-y note. Carrot. Cake. Pancakes. Oh, yes, I went there.

Now, I always loved pancakes growing up. They were probably my number one favorite breakfast food that my mom would make. But it wasn’t until adulthood that my eyes were opened to all the pancake possibilities that exist out there. For most of my childhood and adolescence, I figured pancakes came in two forms: plain, or blueberry. Of course that was very wrong.

shredded carrots

And I’m quite happy to have added these carrot cake pancakes to my I’ve-eaten-that list. Because they are insanely tasty. Instead of maple syrup, you spread cream cheese frosting on them, like you would an actual carrot cake. It’s just divine. And very impressive – you could definitely bust these out for company.

carrot cake pancakes

And now for our usual week recap!

We began the week with Nocello-Spiked Carrot Cupcakes, so now I can check the box of having put a carrot cake on my blog. These are quite lovely thanks to the addition of walnuts and the walnut liqueur.

Nocello-spiked Carrot Cupcakes

 

 

 

 

 

Next we made Vegan Carrot Soup, a lovely rendition of a classic that non-vegans will scarf down enthusiastically.

Vegan carrot soup

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next up: if you can have carrot cake, why not Carrot Pie? You can have it. It’s a thing. And it’s delicious.

Carrot Pie

 

 

 

 

 

And then yesterday, we had a cooked carrot side dish which we glazed with whiskey, butter, and brown sugar (oh, my!). Whiskey Glazed Carrots would make a beautiful side dish to any Easter spread.

Whiskey glazed carrots

 

 

 

 

 

And be sure you check out these carrot recipes from the food blogosphere!

Carrot Cake Scones from Rachel Cooks
Carrot “Fettuccine” with Lemon-Thyme Sauce from In Jennie’s Kitchen
Carrot Salad with Harissa, Feta, and Mint from Smitten Kitchen
Healthy No Sugar Carrot Cake Muffins from Farm Fresh Feasts
Pickled Carrot Sticks from Smitten Kitchen
Spiced Carrot Kale Muffins from Hezzi D’s Books and Cooks
Super Moist Carrot Cake from Sally’s Baking Addiction

Enjoy this lovely breakfast/brunch, y’all!

Carrot cake pancakes

{One Year Ago: Greek Salad with Chickpeas}

Source: slightly adapted from Joy the Baker Cookbook by Joy Wilson

Ingredients:
PANCAKES:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp ground nutmeg
Generous pinch of ground ginger
1 large egg
2 tbs brown sugar
1 cup buttermilk, well shaken
1 tsp pure vanilla extract
2 cups grated carrots
3 tbs butter, for the griddle

FROSTING:
4 oz. cream cheese, at room temperature
1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar
2-3 tbs whole milk
1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract
Dash of ground cinnamon

Directions:
First, make the pancakes. In a large bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger.
In a small bowl, whisk together the egg, brown sugar, buttermilk, and vanilla. Stir in the carrots.
Pour the buttermilk mixture, all at once, into the flour mixture. Whisk until mostly incorporated, then switch to a rubber spatula to combine the rest of the way. Let the batter rest 5 minutes while you make the frosting.
For the frosting: in a medium bowl, use an electric mixer to beat the cream cheese until it is smooth and fluffy. Add the confectioners’ sugar, milk, vanilla, and cinnamon. Beat until smooth. Set aside while you make the pancakes.
Preheat your skillet or griddle over medium heat. Add a pat of butter and smear it around to melt it and cover the whole surface. Ladle about 1/4 cup of batter for each pancake into rounds on the skillet or griddle. Cook, flipping once, until golden on both sides and cooked through in the middle. Transfer the pancakes to a plate or platter. Repeat until all the batter is used up.
To serve, spread each pancake with a dollop of cream cheese spread. Stack them if desired. Consume immediately. 🙂

Whiskey Glazed Carrots

Whiskey Glazed Carrots

I’m continuing Carrot Week with a nod to my blog’s tagline (Confessions of a Formerly Picky Eater). Believe it or not, carrots were not on the banned list for my childhood self’s palate. I actually enjoyed snacking on raw carrot sticks, what with its satisfying crunch and neutral-ish flavor that didn’t offend me. Cook those same carrots, though, and now we have a problem.

Whiskey glazed carrots

Man, I hated cooked carrots as a kid. My mom made them on occasion, and I complained bitterly each and every time. So when I devised Carrot Week for the blog, it only seemed fair to revisit a side dish of cooked carrots. In all honesty, cooked carrots are a dish to which I haven’t paid much attention in the past decade or so; I tend to still prefer them raw and dipped in ranch dressing. So I was curious as to what my now-adventurous adult palate would think. I glazed them with butter, brown sugar, and whiskey, and I made sure not to over- or undercook them. And they turned out quite delicious, I’m happy to report.

whiskey glazed carrots

Maybe I might have even not balked at these as a child. See, Mom, when you made cooked carrots, you should have glazed them with a bunch of whiskey – then I would’ve liked them! Or, at the very least, I would have fallen asleep and shut up about it….

I hope y’all can enjoy these, child and adult alike. I had a thought that they would make a perfect side dish for an Easter or Passover dinner spread…. See what you think!

Whiskey Glazed Carrots

Source: slightly adapted from The Pioneer Woman Cooks: Food From My Frontier by Ree Drummond

Ingredients:
¼ cup unsalted butter
1 lb. carrots, peeled and cut into ½-inch rounds
6 tbs whiskey
6 tbs brown sugar
Kosher salt and black pepper
Fresh thyme leaves, for garnish

Directions:
Melt 2 tbs butter in a 10” skillet, preferably cast-iron, over high heat. Add the carrots and stir to brown them, about 2-3 minutes.
Remove the carrots to a plate with a slotted spoon. If using a gas stove, turn off the heat. Pour the whiskey into the skillet. Let it bubble up and cook for about 3 minutes, or until slightly reduced. Reduce the heat to medium-low and add the remaining 2 tbs butter. When it’s melted, add the brown sugar and stir to combine. Add the carrots back into the skillet and cook for another 5-7 minutes, stirring frequently. Add salt and pepper to taste, and I’d advise adding more black pepper than you usually do to cut the sweetness in this dish.
Continue cooking until the carrots are to your desired softness. Sprinkle some fresh thyme around and serve immediately.

Carrot Pie

Carrot Pie

When I was in college, I worked at Victoria’s Secret part time and over winter breaks and summers for a couple of years. Part of my job description of course included helping the customers find what they were looking for, and many a time, those customers were men shopping for their wives or girlfriends. Almost all of them had quite the awkward vibe going, as if they’d never done this before and felt really clueless. (And I would have to suppose many of them were, judging by the number of returns I did).

carrots for carrot pie

carrots

But anyway, these men were rather shy customers most of the time, so you had to take the lead and ask questions to ascertain what they were looking for, but in asking questions you had to be a bit delicate to make sure you steered clear of stepping in a big pile of TMI. So usually we would start by asking about the lady’s shape and dress size. And I cannot tell you how often we women employees would hear in response, “Well, she looks like you! Only different.”

Yeah, not helpful. Not helpful at all, in fact.

Carrot pie

Which brings me to this pie. Although a bit more elegantly worded than my former Vickie’s Secret male customers, the cookbook’s blurb about this pie can be summed up as, “It’s like pumpkin pie; only different.” And while that sort of is an accurate description, it’s somewhat maddening, so I’m going to try and describe this pie without referencing the more familiar pumpkin pie.

Carrot Pie

First of all, yes, carrot pie is a thing. And why not? If you can have carrot cake, then you can have carrot pie. This is very reminiscent of Indian flavors, so it’s very warm without overpowering the carrot flavor. It’s custardy but quite light; its texture was less smooth than most custard based pies, yet not all the way to grainy, so still quite pleasant. I think carrot pie would make a perfect dessert for the end of an Indian food themed dinner party. Enjoy!

carrot pie

Source: A Year of Pies by Ashley English

Ingredients:
Basic pie dough to fit a 9-inch pie plate (I used a half batch of this recipe)
1 lb. carrots, peeled and ends removed
½ cup packed brown sugar
1 cup whole milk
1 tsp ground cardamom
½ tsp ground ginger
½ tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp ground black pepper
½ tsp kosher salt
3 large eggs, separated

Directions:
Preheat your oven to 400 F. Grease a 9-inch pie plate.
Roll out the pie dough on a floured surface and fit it into the prepared pie plate. Price the bottom and sides of the crust with tines of a fork, then place the crust in the refrigerator for at least 15 minutes.
Line the crust with parchment paper and fill it with dried beans or pie weights. Bake 10 to 12 minutes, then remove the crust from the oven. Leave the oven on and reduce the temperature to 375 F.
Remove the beans/weights from the crust and let it cool completely.
Meanwhile, make the filling. Cut the prepped carrots into ¼-inch rounds. Fill a small saucepan with a couple inches of water and let it come to a soft boil. Add the carrots and let them boil until softened. Drain them thoroughly and transfer the carrots to the bowl of your food processor. Puree until very smooth. Now add the sugar, milk, spices, and salt to the carrot puree. Process again until smooth and uniform. Pour the mixture into a medium sized bowl.
Whisk the egg yolks in a small bowl until blended. Using either a whisk or electric mixer, beat the egg whites until soft peaks form in a separate bowl.
Whisk the beaten egg yolks into the carrot puree until thoroughly blended, then whisk in the beaten whites. No need to be careful about not deflating them, so you don’t have to be gentle when incorporating them into the carrot puree.
Pour the puree into the cooled pie shell. Set the pie on a rimmed baking sheet and bake for 40 to 45 minutes, until the filling is set.
Cool at least 30 minutes before serving. Hint: it’s really tasty served chilled. And once it’s chilled, you can totally pick up a slice with your hands and eat it while walking around. I heard that from a friend…

Vegan Carrot Soup

vegan carrot soup

So it’s Carrot Week here at the Texan New Yorker, and yesterday I showcased carrots in dessert form, so I figure today I’m going to give you an extremely healthy soup. I found this recipe in Joanne Chang’s second cookbook, Flour Too, and she serves this at her bakeries for lunchtime patrons.

Vegan Carrot soup

Last fall, I went to visit my mom in Cambridge, MA, (she was there for a conference) and I was able to dine at the original Flour locale. Twice. In one day. Needless to say, it was phenomenal. This soup isn’t what I ordered (carrots weren’t really in season back in November), but having tasted it at home, I can completely see why the locals would go nuts over it.

vegan carrot soup

Vegan carrot soup

Chef Chang says she has a rule about making vegan dishes at the bakery: non-vegans must go nuts over them too. She hit the nail on the head with this one. Matt and I aren’t vegans, but we LOVED this soup. I think the secret is roasting the carrots. That method coaxes out so much flavor I’m not even sure I knew carrots had. Really amazing end results. Vegan or not, you should try it.

Vegan Carrot Soup

{One year ago: “Old Fashioned” Snickerdoodles}

Source: slightly adapted from Flour, Too by Joanne Chang

Ingredients:
2 lbs. carrots, peeled and cut crosswise into 1-inch chunks
3 tbs olive oil
2 tsp chopped fresh thyme
Kosher salt and black pepper
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
1 celery stalk, sliced crosswise
1 medium fennel bulb, leafy tops trimmed and bulb cored and thinly sliced
3 garlic cloves, smashed and peeled
2-inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and sliced into rounds
6 cups good-quality vegetable stock
1 small tart apple, such as Granny Smith, peeled, cored, and chopped
½ tsp fresh grated nutmeg
Pinch of dried thyme

Directions:
Preheat your oven to 400 F. Place a rack in the center of the oven.
Spread the carrots on a baking sheet. Drizzle with 2 tbs of olive oil, plus the fresh thyme and salt and pepper to taste. Toss with your hands to make sure they are evenly coated. Roast the carrots for 35 to 45 minutes, or until tender. Set aside.
In a large stockpot, heat the remaining 1 tbs olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion, celery, fennel and garlic. Cook the vegetables, stirring occasionally, about 6-8 minutes, or until softened. Stir in the ginger, the roasted carrots and the stock. Bring to a boil.
Now add the apple and simmer about 1 minute. Remove from the heat.
Use an immersion blender to puree the soup until very smooth. Add the nutmeg, dried thyme, and taste for seasoning. It will likely need some salt and pepper at this point.
Ladle the soup into bowls and serve warm.