Leftover Turkey Noodle Soup with Turkey Carcass Stock

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Today, I think we should discuss Thanksgiving turkey carcasses. Exciting and appetizing right? Mmmm…. No, really we should.

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Many moons ago I graduated from the wonderful Baylor University (sec ‘em Bears!), which is located in Waco, Texas, a small town that descriptively sits somewhere in between completely rural and decent-sized town. One year, I was driving down the street from my residence a couple days after Turkey Day and I had to stop my car because right smack in the middle of the street an enormous vulture was chowing down on a turkey carcass he’d dragged out of someone’s garbage bag.

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I figured he would move when he saw my car, but no. He just gave me this “yeah, what are you lookin’ at?” look and went back to feasting on that carcass. I actually had to drive around him, which also didn’t faze him one bit.

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So this year, I say we all encourage the vultures to stay out of the residential neighborhoods by using our turkey carcass to make one of the most delicious noodle soups I’ve ever tasted! Yeah, save your carcass after you’ve carved your turkey. It then goes into the largest pot you have (or hack it up into large pieces and divide among two pots – I had to and it works just fine); fill the pot with aromatics and water and let it simmer away. In a few hours you will have the richest, most beautiful turkey stock with which to make your soup, your house will have the warmest and most fragrant aroma, and your neighbor may even be texting you to find out what is making the whole building smell so good.

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Then you use some shredded leftover turkey meat to make a delicious, comforting noodle soup that can feed your whole family. It is sooooo good. I hope y’all will enjoy it!

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Source: slightly adapted from Down South by Donald Link

Ingredients:

TURKEY STOCK:
1 turkey carcass from 1 roasted turkey (use a meat cleaver to hack up the carcass into pieces if necessary)
1 onion, peeled and chunked
2 celery stalks, rough chopped
1 carrot, rough chopped (no need to peel it)
4 garlic cloves, smashed (no need to peel)
4 fresh bay leaves
1 tbs black peppercorns

SOUP:
1 tbs olive oil
1 medium onion, diced
4 celery stalks, diced
2 carrots, peeled and diced
6 garlic cloves, minced
6 fresh bay leaves
2 tbs Dijon or whole-grain mustard
2 tbs red wine vinegar
1 tbs dried oregano
½ tsp poultry seasoning
Kosher salt and black pepper
Up to 3 cups of store-bought chicken or turkey stock (maybe)
2 cups shredded turkey meat, light and/or dark, leftover from the roasted turkey
8 oz. wide egg noodles
Fresh flat-leaf parsley, for garnish

Directions:
To make the STOCK: in the largest pot you have, combine the turkey carcass bones with the onion, celery, carrot, garlic, bay leaves, peppercorns, and 6 quarts of water. If you need to, you can split this evenly between 2 stockpots (I had to).
Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce the heat, and simmer, skimming the fat off the top as needed, for 3 hours. Strain the stock. If not using immediately, store in the refrigerator for a few days.
Now make the SOUP: heat the olive oil in a large, heavy-bottomed pot, like a Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the onion, celery, carrots, garlic, and bay leaves and cook until the vegetables have softened, 5 to 7 minutes. Add the mustard, vinegar, oregano, poultry seasoning, 1 tbs kosher salt and 2 tsp black pepper.
Measure 2 quarts plus 2 cups of the turkey stock you just made. If you have less than that, no big deal, just supplement with the store-bought stock. Add the stock to the soup pot, then add the turkey meat.
Simmer, skimming the fat as it rises to the surface periodically, until the meat is very tender, about 30-45 minutes.
When the soup is nearly ready, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Salt it generously, then add the noodles. Cook until just al dente, then drain them and transfer to the soup pot. Simmer them for about 15 minutes to allow them to absorb some soup broth.
Taste for seasoning, adding more salt or pepper as needed. Serve the soup in either large, deep bowls or wide, shallow bowls garnished with parsley, if desired.

Thanksgiving Recipe Round-Up 2014

Thanksgiving is mere DAYS away, so I hope you’ve got your menus finalized! But in case you don’t, I’m giving you a recipe round-up of ideas for your big Turkey Day. Enjoy!

BREAKFAST AND BRUNCH:

Cranberry Apple Muffins

Apple Butter Doughnuts
Apple Cheddar Quiche
Apple Cider Doughnuts
Apple Pie Bagels
Apple Streusel Bread
Beer Waffles with Cinnamon Apples and Caramel Sauce
Cranberry Apple Muffins {pictured above}
Pumpkin French Toast
Pumpkin Muffins
Pumpkin Pecan Souffled Pancake
Pumpkin Praline Pancakes
Pumpkin Scones
Savory Apple, Herb and Oat Scones

APPETIZERS, SALADS, AND FIRST COURSES:

Apple Escarole Salad
Butternut Squash and Spinach Chowder
Butternut Squash Latkes with Pine Nut Yogurt Sauce
Butternut Squash, Onion and Espresso Bruschetta
Chipotle Pumpkin Chowder
Massaged Collard Greens Salad with Smashed Croutons
Roasted Butternut Squash Salad with Apple Cider Vinaigrette
Stuffing Bruschetta {pictured above}

SIDE DISHES:

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Almond-Roasted Brussels Sprouts and Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts with Sherry Vinaigrette and Prosciutto Bread Crumbs
Fried Brussels Sprouts with Pecans and Capers
Green Bean Casserole
Happy Accident Mashed Potatoes
Indian-Spiced Cranberry Chutney
Pumpkin Polenta with Maple Syrup Black Pepper Pecans
Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Apples, Onion and Candied Pecans
Rosemary-Mustard Roasted Sweet Potato Wedges
Savory Butternut Squash Crumble {pictured above}
Sweet Potato Biscuits

MAIN DISHES:

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Cider-Glazed Turkey with Lager Gravy {pictured above}
Truffle Butter Roast Turkey

DESSERTS:
Cakes:

Pumpkin Apple Cake

Apple Cider Cupcakes with Cinnamon Cream Cheese Frosting
Apple Pecan Cheesecake Cupcakes
Caramel Apple Layer Cake
Easy Cranberry Apple Cake
My Mom’s Apple Cake
Pumpkin Apple Cake {pictured above}
Pumpkin Cheesecake
Pumpkin Cupcakes with Chocolate Cream Cheese Frosting
Pumpkin Pecan Cake with Bourbon Brown Sugar Glaze

Pies:

pecan praline topped pumpkin pie 5967

Apple Cider Cream Pie
Apple Pie {deep dish}
Bacon-Streusel Topped Apple Pie
Bourbon Pecan Pie
Butternut Squash Pie with Cinnamon-Brandy Whipped Cream
Chocolate Meringue Pie
Cranberry Chiffon Pie
French Apple Tart
Pecan Praline Topped Pumpkin Pie {pictured above}
Pumpkin Pie {entirely from scratch}
Sorghum Marshmallow Topped Sweet Potato Pie

Ice Creams:

Pumpkin Ice Cream

Apple Pie Ice Cream
Pumpkin Ice Cream {pictured above}

Crisps and Cobblers:

Apple Crisp

Apple Crisp {pictured above}
Apple Hatch Chile Cobbler
Apple Maple Walnut Cobbler

Cookies and Candy:

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Apple Fritters
Pumpkin Crispy Rice Treats
Pumpkin Gingersnaps {pictured above}
Pumpkin Pie Fudge
Sweet Potato Chocolate Chip Cookies

BEVERAGES:

Apple Cider Margaritas

Apple Cider Margaritas {pictured above}
Buttered Spiked Apple Cider
Pumpkin Pie Milkshakes

DIY Yellow Mustard #SundaySupper

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Welcome to a holiday edition of Sunday Supper where this week we are featuring Thanksgiving Leftovers! You know you’re gonna have them, and you know you can only eat so many slapped-together sandwiches before you want to pull your hair out. So we are here to give you creative and delicious ideas of what to do in the days following Turkey Day!

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As soon as I heard today’s theme, I knew exactly what I wanted to make. You’re probably curious as to how making mustard could possibly count as a Thanksgiving leftover, but I promise, it does! In my family growing up, we weren’t all that big on transforming leftover turkey, so it would sit in the fridge in food storage bags, and one year in I believe late elementary school, I got the idea to take those cold shredded turkey pieces and eat them straight, dipped in yellow ballpark mustard.

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Okay, seriously, it’s one of the best things you’ll ever taste. I don’t know what it is, but it’s just soooo darn good! I have so many fond memories of sneaking into the fridge late Thanksgiving night, or the night after, and plowing through a bag of turkey, dipping each piece in yellow mustard, while watching TV or chatting on the phone with a friend. I was such a fiend for this little tradition of mine that one year we had fewer leftovers for some reason and I dipped into a stash of turkey reserved for a soup, and got in a bit of trouble. It was worth it, my friends.

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I could never convince my parents or sister of the merits of this little snack, but I have been able to convince Matt, and I hope I’ve encouraged all of you to give it a try too. For the record, Matt absolutely loves it and actually looks forward to it all year long.

DIY Yellow Mustard

So this year, the Sunday Supper team gave me a perfect excuse to make mustard from scratch, which I’d never done before. It’s very easy and the results are fantastic! Just let it sit at room temperature for about two to three days before using it. That’s about how long it takes to mellow into a “normal” mustard taste. Before that, the mustard flavor is strong to the point of almost horseradish spice levels. Personally, a bit much for my palate. But after a couple days, it was perfect.

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Be sure you check out my Sunday Supper gang and their wonderful recipes for repurposing Thanksgiving leftovers! And do try my mustard trick, even if it strikes you as odd. Let me know what you think, I’d love to hear from you!

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Source: Leite’s Culinaria

Ingredients:
1 cup cold water
3/4 cup yellow dry mustard
3/4 teaspoon coarse sea salt or kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
1/8 teaspoon paprika
1/2 cup white distilled vinegar

Directions:
Place the water, dry mustard, salt, turmeric, garlic, and paprika in a small nonreactive saucepan and whisk until smooth. Cook the mixture over medium-low to low heat, stirring often, until it bubbles down to a thick paste, 30 to 45 minutes. Please do this in a well-ventilated kitchen, or at least open your windows.
Whisk the vinegar into the mustard mixture and continue to cook until it’s thickened to the desired consistency—you know, the usual prepared mustard consistency, which ought to take anywhere from 7 to 15 minutes.
Let the mustard cool to room temperature. Transfer the mustard to an airtight container, cover, and keep at room temperature for 2-3 days, then refrigerate for up to 3 months. The mustard will be quite pungent the first few days, but will mellow with time.

Breakfast:

Cranberry Sauce Muffins by The Foodie Army Wife
Leftover Stuffing Breakfast Strata by Ruffles & Truffles
Sweet Potato Casserole Muffins by Magnolia Days
Turkey & Chorizo Breakfast Hash by Brunch with Joy
Italian Mashed Potato Pancakes by The Weekend Gourmet
Cranberry Sauce’d Corn Bread Muffins by Rhubarb and Honey

Main Dish:

Leftover Pie by Jane’s Adventures in Dinner
Thanksgiving Leftover Waffles by Foxes Love Lemons
Stuffing Hash by The Girl in the Little Red Kitchen
Turkey Pizza by Meal Diva
Turkey & Caramelized Onion Risotto by kimchi MOM
Turkey with Creamy Mushroom Marsala Sauce by Casa de Crews
Moroccan Turkey Stew by What Smells So Good?
Peruvian Cilantro & Turkey Soup by The Little Ferraro Kitchen
Turkey & Butternut Squash Stew by Cooking Chat
Turkey Kreplach Soup by Panning the Globe
Turkey & Stuffing Crepes by Peaceful Cooking
Cranberry Apple Pecan Chicken Salad by NeighborFood
Herbed Turkey over Cornbread Waffles with Cranberry Sauce by girlichef
Creamy Peanut Gochujang Pasta by Wallflour Girl
Cranberry Sweet Potato Soup by Take A Bite Out of Boca
Turkey Enchilada Pasta Bake by Curious Cuisiniere
Turkey Orzo Risotto by Family Foodie
Turkey Croquettes by Cindy’s Recipes and Writings

Side Dishes:

Cheesy Mashed Potato Croquettes by Noshing with the Nolands
Whipped Carrots with Sriracha Butter by Healthy Delicious
Cranberry-Balsamic Glazed Cauliflower Wings by Cupcakes & Kale Chips
Parmesan Mashed Cauliflower and Potatoes by Momma’s Meals
Cheesy Jalapeño Potato Cakes by Bobbi’s Cozy Kitchen

Sandwiches:

Cranberry & Turkey Sandwich by The Redhead Baker
Monte Cristo Sandwich by Nik Snacks
Hot Brown Turkey Sandwiches by The Life and Loves of Grumpy’s Honeybunch
Sprouted Grain Turkey, Cranberry & Brie Panini by Amee’s Savory Dish
Turkey Cranberry Flatbread by Peanut Butter and Peppers

Condiments & Sauces:

Cranberry Vinaigrette by Nosh My Way
Leftover White Wine Syrup by Food Lust People Love
DIY Yellow Mustard by The Texan New Yorker

Dessert:

Banana Cheesecake with Pecan Graham Cracker Crust by Desserts Required
Cranberry Cream Cheese Bars by That Skinny Chick Can Bake
Gluten-Free Lemon Cake by Hezzi-D’s Books and Cooks
Spiced Cranberry Sauce Buckle by The Wimpy Vegetarian

Cocktails & Drinks:

Cranberry Orange Crush by The Messy Baker
Cranberry Bellini by A Kitchen Hoor’s Adventures

SSbadge-150x150Join the #SundaySupper conversation on Twitter on Sunday!We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7 p.m. ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtagand remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. To get more great Sunday Supper Recipes, visit our website or check out our Pinterest board.

Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement.

Apple Cider Cream Pie

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Alright, y’all – Thanksgiving is one week from today!! Are you ready? I am, but that is because I’m being super, super lazy and hedonistic about Turkey Day this year. Not only am I not hosting, I’m not even bringing anything besides wine. Admittedly, that’s not like me, but it’s all because Matt and I are on vacation as we speak, spending a week in Buenos Aires, Argentina and won’t get back until the day before T’Giving, and then we will show up to dinner jet-lagged. Matt’s family is so lucky to have us as guests. [HA!]

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But for everyone else being much more productive and responsible Thanksgiving citizens, I’ve got another pie idea for your dessert table. This is for all of you who are sick of the usual pecan-pumpkin-sweet potato-apple suspects and want to shake things up a little, while still remaining true to the season and its flavors.

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Apple cider!!! It’s not just for cakes and doughnuts anymore. Once you taste your first bite, you too will conclude that it’s quite at home in a pie. That said, make sure you get a high quality cider to use here. You’re reducing it down and concentrating the flavor, not boozing it up and drinking it, so quality really matters and people will notice if you cheat. The apple cider really shines through.

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And it’s a delicious pie. Its flavor is somewhat lighter than that of pumpkin or sweet potato pies, but when it comes to warmth and earthiness, this pie can play with the big boys. The warm spices are perfectly balanced with the almost tanginess of the cider and the tart apple flavor. Your guests will go crazy for it. Enjoy!

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Source: slightly adapted from First Prize Pies by Allison Kave

Ingredients:
Pie dough for 1 (9-inch) pie
1 ½ cups cloudy, organic apple cider
4 large eggs
¾ cup granulated sugar
½ cup sour cream
¼ tsp salt
1 cup heavy cream
2 tbs confectioners’ sugar
1 tsp ground cinnamon, plus extra for sprinkling

Directions:
Preheat your oven to 425 F. Grease a 9” pie plate. On a lightly floured surface, using a lightly floured rolling pin, roll out your pie dough to about 11-12 inches in diameter. Transfer the dough to your prepared pie plate. Tuck the overhang under and crimp decoratively. Let it chill in the refrigerator for 15-20 minutes. Line the bottom and sides with a piece of parchment paper and fill with pie weights or dried beans. Blind bake the crust for 20 minutes, until partially baked, then remove from the oven and set aside to cool.
While the pie crust is cooling, prepare the apple cider. Pour the apple cider into a small saucepan and boil over high heat until reduced by half, about 5 minutes. You need ¾ cup reduced cider. Let it cool completely.
When the crust and cider reduction have cooled, it’s time to actually bake your pie. Preheat your oven to 350 F. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, granulated sugar, sour cream and salt until fully incorporated. Slowly drizzle in the reduced cider and whisk to fully incorporate.
Place the pie crust on a rimmed baking sheet. Pour the filling into the crust and bake about 50 minutes (you may need less time, so start checking earlier), until the filling has just set. The edges should be set firmly and the center should be jiggly but not liquidy. Remove the pie to a wire rack and cool completely.
Once the pie has cooled and is ready to serve, make the topping. In a large bowl, using your stand mixer, hand mixer or a whisk by hand, whip the cream with the sugar and cinnamon until stiff peaks form. Pile the cream on top of the cooled pie and sprinkle with a dash more ground cinnamon. Slice into wedges and serve.

Sorghum Marshmallow Topped Sweet Potato Pie

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Where I hail from, Thanksgiving tables see more of sweet potato pie than pumpkin pies, and the fact that I preferred pumpkin pie left me in something of a minority within my extended family. Preferred is actually a bit of an understatement; insisted might be more accurate? Since sweet potatoes are classified as vegetables – ugh, the horror – I typically refused to even try a bite of sweet potato pie. Never mind, of course, that pumpkin is also – horror of horrors – a vegetable.

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Somewhere in my mid-twenties I realized my stupidity, not to mention complete hypocrisy, and baked myself a sweet potato pie to try. I think it was July. No matter! The important thing is,  I took one bite and realized further how utterly moronic I’d been for so long, as sweet potato and pumpkin pies are extremely similar. They are about identical in texture and creaminess, with sweet potato pie being a slightly darker color, slightly less sweet, and having a little more intensity of flavor than pumpkin pie.

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I completely understand the appeal! Fortunately I now count myself among sweet potato pie’s legions of fans, and I knew I wanted to finally share one on my blog this Thanksgiving season. So then the question became, do I make the classic with just whipped cream, or something beyond that?

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Then I got to thinking about that traditional side dish/dessert/I-don’t-know-what-the-heck-it-is,-even marshmallow-topped sweet potato dish; the one I’ve never liked or even understood, and frankly still don’t. But it got the idea of marshmallows on top stuck in my head, and I thought, yeah I could make marshmallows from scratch myself, and then I thought more about sweet potato pie being from the South and I remembered seeing a Lee Brothers recipe for sorghum marshmallows and at that point it was all over. I’m making sorghum marshmallows and topping a sweet potato pie with them!!! And of course blasting them with a blowtorch to toast them!

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And here it is. It’s truly one of the best pies I’ve ever tasted. There is such a vast difference between homemade and store-bought marshmallows they hardly resemble each other, and yes, of course homemade is far superior. They lack chemical stabilizers, so when you hit them with the high heat from the broiler or blowtorch, they run all over the pie’s surface. Embrace it. It’s a lovely thing. As is this whole pie! Enjoy!!

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Source: marshmallows and pie adapted from First Prize Pies by Allison Kave

Ingredients:

MARSHMALLOWS:
1 tbs unflavored gelatin
2 cups granulated sugar
2/3 cup sorghum syrup
1 tsp vanilla extract

PIE:
Pie dough for 1 (9-inch) pie
1 lb. sweet potatoes
½ cup firmly packed brown sugar
½ cup pure maple syrup
1 large egg
2 tbs all-purpose flour
½ tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp ground ginger
¼ tsp salt
2 tbs bourbon
½ cup whole milk
½ cup heavy cream

Directions:
First, make the MARSHMALLOWS:
In the bowl of your stand mixer, add 2/3 cup lukewarm water, then sprinkle the gelatin over the water. Fit the stand mixer with the whisk attachment.
In a large, clean, heavy saucepan, combine the sugar, sorghum syrup and another 2/3 cup water. Cook the mixture over medium-high heat, stirring only at the beginning to dissolve the sugar, and boil it until a candy thermometer registers 250-260 F.
When the sugar is close to reaching this stage, turn on the stand mixer to low and let it incorporate the softened gelatin and water. Once the sugar mixture has reached the appropriate temperature, make sure the mixer is on low speed, then carefully pour the hot syrup in a steady stream into the gelatin while mixing. Try to avoid the sides of the bowl and aim for the space between the beater and the side. When all of the syrup has been poured in, gradually increase the speed to high (but gradually, to avoid being splashed) and continue to beat until the mixture is very thick and has tripled in volume, about 5 to 10 minutes. Visual cues work well here – it will look like marshmallow fluff when it’s ready.
Grease an 8×8” glass baking dish and pour in the marshmallow mixture. Cover tightly with plastic wrap, making sure the plastic wrap doesn’t touch the surface of the marshmallows. Let it set up, either at room temperature or in the refrigerator. Mine took around 8 hours to completely set up; if you can’t or don’t want to wait that long, you can spoon the marshmallow fluff into a pastry bag and pipe it onto the pie, then hit it with the blowtorch as directed.
Make the PIE: Preheat your oven to 425 F. Grease a 9” pie plate. On a lightly floured surface, using a lightly floured rolling pin, roll the dough out to a circle 11-12 inches in diameter. Transfer the dough to the prepared pie plate. Tuck the overhang under and crimp the edges decoratively. Chill in the refrigerator while the oven fully preheats.
Place the pie plate on a rimmed baking sheet and line the bottom and sides with parchment paper. Fill with pie weights or dried beans. Blind bake until partially baked, about 20 minutes. Set aside to cool.
Keep the oven at 425 F. With the skin on, prick the sweet potatoes all over with a fork. Put them on a lightly greased oven-safe baking dish and roast about 45 minutes, until a paring knife can be inserted into the thickest part with no resistance. Allow the potatoes to cool, then split them in half and scoop the flesh out into the bowl of your food processor. Discard the skins.
To the food processor, add the brown sugar and maple syrup. Puree until smooth. Add the egg and puree again. With the processor running, add the flour, cinnamon, ginger and salt, followed by the bourbon, milk, and finally the cream. Process the cream until just combined as you do not want to whip it.
Preheat the oven to 350 F. Pour the filling into the cooled crust. Bake in the center of the oven for 40-50 minutes, until the edges are set and the center is still a little wobbly, like Jello.
Allow the pie to come to room temperature before adding the marshmallows.
Run a sharp paring knife around the edges of the marshmallows and tip them out onto a clean work surface. Cut them into squares, about the size of store-bought large marshmallows. Use a large, sharp knife for this.
Grease your hands lightly with cooking spray, then transfer the squares to the top of the pie. Wash your hands thoroughly, then use a blowtorch to char and brown the tops of the marshmallows. They will start to melt and run onto the pie. This is not a bad thing. For best results, let the pie firm up in the refrigerator at least a couple hours and up to overnight. Oh, and you will have leftover marshmallows. This is not a bad thing.

Brussels Sprouts with Sherry Vinaigrette and Prosciutto Bread Crumbs

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Like most red-blooded American children of the ‘80’s, I hated Brussels sprouts growing up. Fortunately, back then the little cabbages weren’t the least bit trendy, and I probably saw them grace our dinner table less than five times in eighteen years.

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Contrast that with today, where Brussels sprouts have enjoyed quite the fifteen minutes of fame in high-end restaurants, best-selling cookbooks, cooking shows, and yes, food blogs. I’m not sure what today’s red-blooded American children are going to do! Parents, please weigh in: do children still hate Brussels sprouts? Or have they too come around to see the merits of these little beauties?

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One sure benefit of the Brussels sprouts craze is that there is much information and instruction on how to cook them properly. Honestly, they are at their best when seared and almost charred. Which is how they are prepared here. And this recipe really impressed me.

I’m sharing it as part of my November-getting-you-ready-for-Thanksgiving thing I’m doing on the blog, and I do think these would be quite at home at any Thanksgiving spread.

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Yes, this recipe requires three separate steps, but, but! All three steps can be done at separate times, and all three steps can be made ahead. The vinaigrette can be made up to three days ahead, the bread crumbs can be made up to two days ahead, and the sprouts themselves can be made several hours in advance. Assembly is a snap, and you can serve this at room temperature, so you can literally throw this together at the *very* last minute with no reheating even remotely necessary.

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And this side dish is so unbelievably delicious, it could easily upstage the turkey (well, okay, maybe not quite this turkey). Think about it: you’ve got perfectly browned and tender Brussels sprouts, doused in a tangy vinaigrette and then coated in this toasty, salty, porky crunch of the bread crumbs. It’s really amazing. Enjoy!

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Source: slightly adapted from The Mozza Cookbook by Nancy Silverton

Ingredients:

PROSCIUTTO BREAD CRUMBS:
1/8 lb. prosciutto, cut into large pieces
1 tbs olive oil
½ cup fresh bread crumbs
¼ cup minced fresh parsley leaves
¼ cup minced fresh chives
3 ½ tbs minced fresh tarragon leaves

SHERRY VINAIGRETTE:
¼ cup sherry vinegar
2 tbs finely chopped shallots
1 tsp kosher salt
½ tsp black pepper
2 tbs olive oil

BRUSSELS SPROUTS:
1 lb. Brussels sprouts, stem ends trimmed, outer leaves removed, and sprouts halved
½ cup plus 1 tbs olive oil, plus more as needed
Kosher salt and black pepper, to taste
Half of a lemon

Directions:
First, make the PROSCIUTTO BREAD CRUMBS: adjust the oven rack to the middle position and preheat to 350 F. Line a plate with paper towels.
Place the prosciutto pieces in a mini food processor and pulse until finely ground. Combine the prosciutto and olive oil in a medium saute pan over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring frequently, until the prosciutto is brown and crisp, about 5 minutes. Turn off the heat and transfer the prosciutto with a slotted spoon to the prepared plate. Add the bread crumbs to the pan and stir to let them soak up the oil from cooking the prosciutto.
Scatter the bread crumbs on a baking sheet and place them in the oven to toast for 8-10 minutes, stirring once or twice during. Remove the bread crumbs from the oven but leave it on. Add the prosciutto and minced herbs to the baking sheet with the bread crumbs and stir to combine. Return the baking sheet to the oven for about 10 minutes, stirring them once or twice and keeping a careful eye (and nose!) to make sure they don’t burn. They should be golden brown and crisp. Set them aside to cool to room temperature. If not using right away, transfer to an airtight food storage container and store them in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. Bring to room temperature before using.
To make the SHERRY VINAIGRETTE, combine the vinegar, shallots, salt and pepper in a small bowl and let it sit for 5 minutes. Add the oil in a slow, steady stream, whisking constantly to combine. If not using right away, transfer to an airtight food storage container and refrigerate for up to 3 days. Bring back to room temperature before using.
To cook the BRUSSELS SPROUTS, put the halves in a large bowl, drizzle them with ¼ cup olive oil, season with salt and pepper to taste, and toss to coat evenly.
Heat the ¼ cup olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat until the oil is almost smoking, 3 to 4 minutes. Using tongs and working in 2 batches, place the Brussels sprouts cut side down in a single layer in the oil and saute them for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until they are golden brown on both sides and tender but not mushy. Remove the sprouts to a bowl or plate as they are done. Repeat, using the last tbs of oil or more as needed, until all the sprouts are cooked. If not using immediately, transfer to an airtight food storage container and keep at room temperature until ready to use.
To assemble and serve the dish: drizzle the sprouts with the vinaigrette, starting with half and seeing if you need the rest. Squeeze a few drops of lemon juice over the sprouts. Transfer the Brussels sprouts to a platter and sprinkle them with the bread crumbs. Be very generous with the bread crumbs. Squeeze a few more drops of lemon juice over the bread crumbs and serve.

Pumpkin Gingersnaps

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Today is Secret Recipe Club reveal day!!! Always so fun. This month I was assigned Our Eating Habits, written by Jamie. Her motto is “Why waste time and calories on bad food?” I couldn’t agree more. I had such a blast searching through Jamie’s blog looking for something to make.

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Somewhat unfortunately, though I really can’t complain, this week’s SRC day coincides with the day before I leave for a vacation, so I wasn’t able to choose anything that would yield leftovers, as they would go bad before I returned. So, I didn’t really have the option to choose recipes like Chickpea Fritters with Yogurt Mint Sauce, or Taco Burgers, or Chicken Fajita Penne. I had to pick something that was either only two servings, or a treat that could be pawned off on others.

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The minute I saw Pumpkin Gingersnaps, I had my answer. These cookies…. I may not have adequate words to tell you how amazing they are, but I’ll try. Well, first I’ll just tell you how easy they are to make! They came together so quickly and it was just such a cooperative dough.

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And they are some of the most perfect holiday cookies you will ever taste. They are chewy and soft in the center, warmly spiced, and not too sweet. Very addictive, too!

Matt and I went nuts over them, as did his coworkers the next day. Thank you for this wonderful recipe, Jamie! Be sure you check out all the deliciousness at Our Eating Habits!

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Source: Our Eating Habits

Ingredients:
½ cup of butter, at room temperature
1 cup granulated sugar, plus more for rolling the cookies
½ cup of pure pumpkin
¼ cup of molasses
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 ⅓ cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1 1/2 teaspoons ground ginger
1 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon salt

Directions:
Preheat your oven to 350 F. Line 2 baking sheets with silpat liners. Set aside. Sprinkle a little extra granulated sugar onto a plate. Set aside.
In a large bowl, use your hand mixer to beat together butter and sugar until creamy. Add the egg, pumpkin, vanilla, and molasses. Beat until combined.
Beat in dry ingredients until just combined. Do not overmix. Refrigerate dough for at least one hour.
Roll dough into balls (about a tablespoon per cookie), or use a cookie scoop, and roll the dough balls in the extra sugar. Place on cookie sheet, evenly spaced apart.
Bake for 10-12 minutes. Let cool on a wire rack. IF you have any left over, store in an airtight container.


Rabbit Braised with Kalamata Olives and Prunes #SundaySupper

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It’s time for another Sunday Supper, and our theme this week is a (perhaps welcome?) departure from holiday food chatter: On the Hunt! So what does On the Hunt mean? It means that our recipe had to feature an ingredient that historically had to be hunted or foraged. Meats like rabbit, venison and wild boar; produce items like wild mushrooms and wild berries, OR we could feature an ingredient that is hard to find and we have to “hunt down” either by ordering via internet or driving across town to locate.

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I chose to feature rabbit, a meat that was historically hunted in the wild. To be clear though, the Sunday Supper crew did *not* require me to hunt this rabbit myself. Kind of a metaphorical theme here, so yes, I did just purchase a rabbit from my local grocery store. You can stop attempting to picture me in camouflage. :)

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This was my first time to ever cook rabbit at home, and I’d only eaten it in a restaurant once before. And now I have to join the ranks of chefs who lament that rabbit doesn’t seem to be much of a thing in American cuisine. As it’s been said, rabbit is a lean, delicious protein low in cholesterol, and you couldn’t ask for a more naturally sustainable source of protein either. I mean, the phrase “breeds like bunnies” does exist for a reason!

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This particular preparation of rabbit was just beyond delicious. Matt and I raved for days. Leftovers performed very well just being reheated in a cheap microwave, too (always a plus!). After seeing how easy it was to cook, and how pleasurable it was to eat rabbit, this is one American who will definitely be doing her small part to get more rabbit into the American diet. I hope y’all enjoy this one!

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And do not forget to check out the rest of my Sunday Supper crew and see what they “hunted” this week!

Source: Man Made Meals by Steven Raichlen

Ingredients:
2 thick slices of bacon, cut crosswise into ¼-inch pieces
8 to 12 cipollini onions, peeled* and roots and tips cut off, halved if large
3 medium carrots, peeled and cut crosswise into 2-inch pieces
1 whole rabbit (about 3 lbs.), butchered into 6 pieces: 2 foreleg pieces, 2 hind leg pieces, and 2 loin (back) pieces (have your butcher do this!!!)
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
½ cup all-purpose flour
2 tbs unsalted butter, or more as needed
1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped
1 cup dry red wine (I used Syrah)
2 cups chicken or veal stock
2 sprigs of fresh thyme
1 cup pitted Kalamata olives
1 cup pitted prunes

Directions:
Preheat your oven to 275 F.
Place the bacon in a large Dutch oven or other oven-proof heavy pot and cook it over medium heat, until browned and crispy, about 3-5 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the bacon bits to a paper towel lined plate.
Add the onions and carrots to the pot with the bacon fat and cook over high heat until browned, about 3-5 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the onions and carrots to the plate with the bacon. Cover the plate with aluminum foil and set aside in the refrigerator. Pour off all but 1 tbs bacon fat from the pot.
Generously season the rabbit pieces with salt and pepper. Sprinkle the rabbit pieces with the flour, tossing them to coat on all sides and shaking off the excess.
Add the butter to the pot and melt it over medium heat. Add the rabbit pieces and brown them on all sides, about 3 minutes per side. The pieces should cook in a single layer with about 1 inch space between pieces, so work in batches if necessary. Transfer each piece of browned rabbit to a plate. In the last 30 seconds of cooking, add the garlic and stir to cook.
Quickly remove the last pieces of rabbit to a plate and then immediately add the red wine and let it come up to a boil, scraping up the browned bits from the bottom of the pot. Add the stock and thyme sprigs and let it come to a boil. Kill the heat, add the rabbit back in, and cover the pot with a layer of aluminum foil. Then place the pot’s lid on top and transfer to the oven. Braise the rabbit for 2 hours without peeking.
Remove the pot from the oven. Stir in the bacon, onions and carrot, plus the olives and prunes. Re-cover the pot with both the foil and the lid, return to the oven and continue braising for 1 more hour, 3 hours in total. Check the rabbit after 30 minutes, and if the sauce is looking watery, let it braise uncovered completely the rest of the way. You want the meat very tender, falling off the bone almost, and the vegetables tender.
Taste for seasoning, then serve the rabbit right from the pot.
*To peel the onions, simply blanch in boiling water for 1 minute, then remove with a spider or slotted spoon to a bowl. Let cool for a minute or two, just until you can handle them, and then peel the skins off with your fingers.

Spread it on Thick

Nibbles and Sides

The Main Event

Sweet Treats

Sunday Supper MovementJoin the #SundaySupper conversation on Twitter on Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7 p.m. ET.  Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. To get more great Sunday Supper Recipes, visit our website or check out our Pinterest board.

Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement.

Pecan Praline Topped Pumpkin Pie

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For me personally, Thanksgiving is simply not Thanksgiving without a pumpkin pie, so I couldn’t not share one with you this year. And while there is absolutely nothing (in my book anyway) wrong with a classic pumpkin pie piled high with whipped cream, I wanted to do something a little more unique this year.

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Enter a pecan praline topping! I’d actually tasted such a pumpkin pie a couple years ago, when my sister made one for us. We all raved, and even strongly considered stealing my brother-in-law’s slice when he left the house on some errands, as it was the last piece. Integrity got the better of us.

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Needless to say, this pie is delicious and will be a huge hit at your dessert spread, oh, two weeks from this past Thursday.

A few recipe notes:

1) Make sure your pie is completely cooled before you add the praline topping.

2) The praline topping doesn’t spread like frosting or glaze. Wherever you put it, that’s where it immediately starts to set up. So plan accordingly.

3) You can serve this as soon as the praline sets up (which only takes a few minutes), but for best results, let the pie chill in the refrigerator for several hours or up to overnight.

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Enjoy this beautiful pie! I think it’s sort of a mish-mash between my Southern-ish roots (the praline) and my northern surroundings (pumpkin pie is more common up here, whereas sweet potato pie is more common down South). The praline topping would also be delicious on sweet potato pie, I should note. I hope you love it!

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Sources: Pie is from The King Arthur Flour Baker’s Companion; Pecan Praline is adapted from Joy the Baker Cookbook by Joy Wilson

Ingredients:

PIE:
Pie dough for 1 (9-inch) pie
1 (15 oz.) can pumpkin puree, not pie filling
3 large eggs
¾ cup brown sugar
½ tsp salt
1 ½ tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp ground ginger
¼ tsp ground allspice
¼ tsp ground nutmeg
1 (12 oz.) can evaporated milk

PRALINE TOPPING:
¾ cup packed dark brown sugar
¾ cup granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
6 tbs heavy cream
1 ½ cups pecan halves
2 ½ tbs unsalted butter

Directions:
First, make the PIE. Preheat your oven to 425 F. On a lightly floured surface, using a lightly floured rolling pin, roll out the pie dough to about a 12” circle. Grease a 9” pie plate, and carefully transfer the pie dough to the prepared plate. Use your hands to work the pie shell into place and then turn the edges under and crimp them decoratively. Set the pie shell in the refrigerator to chill while you make the filling.
In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the pumpkin and eggs until smooth. Whisk in the remaining ingredients.
Pour the filling into the prepared pie shell. Set the pie plate on a rimmed baking sheet and carefully transfer to the oven.
Bake for 15 minutes, then reduce the oven temperature to 350 F. Bake an additional 35-40 minutes, until the filling is set around the edges, but still jiggly in the center. Always remember, the center of the pie should be jiggly like Jello but not liquidy.
Remove the pie from the oven and let it cool completely on a cooling rack.
Now make the PRALINE TOPPING: place a medium, heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium heat. Add both sugars, salt, and cream. Heat to boiling, turn the heat to low and continue cooking until all the sugar is dissolved and the mixture is smooth and bubbling. Add the pecans and butter to the mixture and cook, stirring, until butter is melted. Let the mixture cook at a rolling simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and let it sit until the bubbling has stopped.
Quickly pour the hot praline over the top of the pie. Let the praline harden into place, then for best results, let the pie chill in the refrigerator for at least a couple of hours, if not overnight. Slice into wedges and serve.

Pumpkin Polenta with Maple Syrup Black Pepper Pecans

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Thanksgiving dinner is all about the sides for lots of people, but I’m convinced that pretty much all of those people have two ovens in their kitchens. If you are roasting a turkey or turkey breast and you only have one oven, the sides can become a thorn in your side very quickly. As a member of the Tiny Kitchen with Only One Oven Club, I’m quite partial to side dishes that can either be made ahead, or are entirely stovetop. Oh, and if they’re really, really quick, that’s just a lovely added bonus that makes me love them even more.

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So I’m sharing the perfect Thanksgiving side dish today for those of us not blessed with that second oven. You do need your oven space for the pecans, but they can be made up to two weeks ahead and stored in an airtight food storage container, and don’t even need to be reheated!

And then the polenta? It cooks entirely in one pot on the stovetop, and it’s done in less than 10 minutes. Oh, and it’s creamy, hearty, satisfying and delicious. Seriously, this is probably the simplest Thanksgiving side you could ever make.

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The pumpkin flavor was more subtle than I was expecting, but still there, and as Matt said, “pumpkin doesn’t have to beat you over the head every single time.” I was happy with the dish. Hopefully you and yours will be, too. Enjoy!

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Source: Polenta from 365: No Repeats by Rachael Ray and Pecans from Fine Cooking Magazine, Oct/Nov 2012

Ingredients:

PECANS:
1 tbs egg whites (about ½ the whites from 1 large egg)
Kosher salt
¼ cup pure maple syrup
2 tbs unsalted butter, melted and slightly cooled
Coarsely ground black pepper
2 cups (8 oz.) pecan halves

POLENTA:
2 ½ cups vegetable or chicken stock
1 cup whole milk
1 cup canned pumpkin puree
Freshly grated nutmeg, to taste
¾ cup quick-cooking or instant polenta
½ cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tbs unsalted butter
Kosher salt and black pepper

Directions:
First, make the PECANS: preheat your oven to 325 F and place a rack in the center.
In a medium bowl, whisk the egg white with 1 tsp kosher salt until very frothy, about 1 minute. Whisk in the maple syrup, butter, and 2 tsp black pepper, then stir in the pecans with a large spoon. Make sure they are fully coated.
Spread the pecans on a rimmed baking sheet and bake, stirring once or twice with a spatula, until they have absorbed all the glaze and are a shade darker, 15 to 20 minutes. Transfer to a rack and let cool for about 5 minutes. Stir with the spatula and continue to cool until crisp, about 5 minutes more. Store in an airtight container if not using immediately.
Right before you plan to serve, make the POLENTA: in a medium saucepot, combine the stock, milk and pumpkin puree. Season with nutmeg, salt and pepper. Place over high heat and bring to a simmer. Back off the heat a little, to around medium-to medium-high and slowly whisk in the polenta. Whisk or stir continuously until the polenta begins to mass together and thicken up. This will take about 5 minutes. Lower the heat to low, and add the grated cheese and butter and stir to combine and let the butter melt. You will likely need to lower your heat level during the whisking of the polenta, as polenta really gets an attitude and will start to spit at you. Taste for seasoning and adjust as needed. Serve immediately, sprinkling each serving with a nice handful of pecans.
Note: polenta is very forgiving; if it gets too thick, just thin it with a splash of stock or milk. Also note that you will likely have extra pecans. This is not a bad thing.